3 Phoenix police officers resign after forcing teen to eat marijuana during traffic stop

Source: Phoenix Police Department via AP

Three Phoenix police officers resigned on Thursday after two of them forced a teenager to eat a gram of marijuana during a Sept. 13 traffic stop, Phoenix police chief Joseph Yahner said at a press conference, according to Reuters. The police lieutenant who supervised the officers has also been demoted.

"The allegations against these former officers are compelling, appalling and extremely unprofessional," Yahner reportedly said during a press conference. "Appropriate action has been taken."

The three officers involved in the incident were Richard Pina, Jason McFadden and Michael Carnicle, and their supervisor was Jeff Farrior. 

Yahner said he was planning to fire the three officers involved in the incident, but instead they resigned. Farrior, meanwhile, was demoted for not taking swift action after learning what had happened.

Phoenix police chief Joseph Yahner
Source: 
Ross D. Franklin/AP

The Sept. 13 traffic stop: At around 3:30 a.m., officers pulled over a 19-year-old driver for speeding, according to Reuters. They eventually came upon marijuana — which has been approved for medical purposes in Arizona, but not yet for recreational use — inside the teen's car. 

Pina and McFadden reportedly ordered him to eat it.

The teen followed the officers' demands and swallowed the gram of marijuana, Reuters reported. He later reported that the drug made him feel temporarily ill.

The officers proceeded to write the teen a traffic ticket. That same day, he filed a complaint.

Pina and McFadden may still face criminal charges in connection to the event, police spokesman Sergeant Jonathan Howard said, according to Reuters. Carnicle was present at the traffic stop, but didn't take part in the other officers' disturbing demands.

"This conduct is contrary to everything we stand for and it undermines the good actions of the men and women of the Phoenix police department," Yahner reportedly said.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Jordyn Taylor

Jordyn is an editor on Mic's news desk. She previously worked at the New York Observer, and is a graduate of Hamilton College and New York University. Jordyn is based in New York, and can be reached at jht@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Kshama Sawant on why Seattle needs an independent investigation into the Charleena Lyles shooting

Seattle City Councilperson Kshama Sawant, member of Socialist Alternative party, discusses the Charleena Lyles investigation, tenant voter registration, why Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 and more.

The EPA seeks to undo clean water rule, putting 117 million Americans' water at risk

The new rule could have "long-reaching consequences for everyone living in the United States.”

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Here's what New York's first official LGBTQ monument will look like

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

How will Trump's travel ban be enforced? Here's what the Supreme Court's decision really means.

The Supreme Court's order prevents most of the ban from taking effect before the case is heard, with limited exceptions.

Tick saliva could be the key to fighting a dangerous heart condition

Ticks could hold the secret to treating this heart condition.

Kshama Sawant on why Seattle needs an independent investigation into the Charleena Lyles shooting

Seattle City Councilperson Kshama Sawant, member of Socialist Alternative party, discusses the Charleena Lyles investigation, tenant voter registration, why Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 and more.

The EPA seeks to undo clean water rule, putting 117 million Americans' water at risk

The new rule could have "long-reaching consequences for everyone living in the United States.”

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Here's what New York's first official LGBTQ monument will look like

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

How will Trump's travel ban be enforced? Here's what the Supreme Court's decision really means.

The Supreme Court's order prevents most of the ban from taking effect before the case is heard, with limited exceptions.

Tick saliva could be the key to fighting a dangerous heart condition

Ticks could hold the secret to treating this heart condition.