Who won the presidential debate? Twitter weighs in on the Trump vs. Clinton showdown.

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Donald Trump interrupted Hillary Clinton at least 20 times. Clinton attacked Trump for not releasing his tax returns. Trump touted an unconstitutional tactic for policing. Both candidates said they were best prepared to beat ISIS

Overall, the general feeling on Twitter was that Clinton came out on top by keeping her composure as her opponent bent the truth on things like his support for the Iraq war and past remarks on climate change, and hurled sexist remarks Clinton's way.

Early on, Trump and Clinton debated their policy proposals on trade and Early on, Trump and Clinton debated their policy proposals on trade and taxes. They argued over whose economic plan is better for the country. But the political face-off quickly devolved into something more personal.

Despite an at times testy debate, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton shook hands and laughed at the end of the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in New York.
Source: 
David Goldman/AP

Clinton went after Trump for not releasing his tax returns. Trump hit back by saying he will release his returns when Clinton releases her deleted emails. They battled further over race relations, foreign policy and policing. Trump defended his pursuit of Barack Obama's birth certificate. 

Early in the debate, it seemed to be anyone's game. In fact, Trump seemed to be on track to win. 

But a series of aggressive stances and wandering answers hurt Trump, and some on Twitter said Clinton appeared to handle the tension with more poise.

Even Trump's most loyal supporters did not claim a victory for him. Early in the debate, some of them indicated they believed Trump was winning. But as the debate progressed, they largely stayed quiet or fell back on popular anti-Clinton narratives. 

How the debate affected the views of voters will not be known for at least a few days. Post-debate poll results could be released as early as the end of the week.

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Will Drabold

Will Drabold is a policy writer at Mic. He writes Navigating Trump's America, Mic's daily read on Donald Trump's America. He is based in Washington, D.C., and can be reached at wdrabold@mic.com

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