Video of the fatal police shooting of 6-year-old Jeremy Mardis has been released

Source: AP
Source: AP

The police body camera footage showing the November 2015 shooting death of 6-year-old Jeremy Mardis was released on Wednesday as part of a preliminary hearing in the charges against the two deputies involved in the shooting, Officer Norris Greenhouse, Jr. and Lt. Derrick Stafford, the New York Times reported on Thursday. 

The young boy was shot and killed during a car chase in Central Louisiana on Nov. 3, 2015. Around five minutes of released footage, which is graphic, can be seen here. In the audio of the footage, Stafford can be heard saying "I never saw a kid in the car, man," the Times reports.

Mardis was buckled into the front passenger seat of an SUV driven by his father, Christopher Few, when deputies engaged in pursuit. According to the Times, prosecutors say officers fired 18 times into the vehicle. Mardis was hit five times, and was pronounced dead at the scene. His father was wounded. In the footage released Wednesday, Few can be seen bleeding, slumped out of the driver's side window. 

In the audio that accompanies the released body cam footage, an officer can be heard saying "There's a juvenile" just after the shooting. "Is he hit? The driver?" someone can be heard asking. Later, an officer can be heard saying, "This kid is."

The release of police body cam footage to the public has been a pressing issue of late, particularly after the recent police shooting death of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina. Though the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department initially said it had no plans to release body cam footage of Scott's death, it eventually released the videos amid public pressure.

After Mardis' death, Greenhouse Jr. and Stafford were separately charged with second-degree murder and attempted second-degree murder, the Associated Press reports. According to the AP, an attorney for the prosecutor's office claims that Stafford had a history of excessive force.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Anna Swartz

Anna is a staff writer for Mic covering breaking news. She can be reached at aswartz@mic.com.

MORE FROM

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Here's what New York's first official LGBTQ monument will look like

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

How will Trump's travel ban be enforced? Here's what the Supreme Court's decision really means.

The Supreme Court's order prevents most of the ban from taking effect before the case is heard, with limited exceptions.

Tick saliva could be the key to fighting a dangerous heart condition

Ticks could hold the secret to treating this heart condition.

CNN retraction and undercover video feeds into pro-Trump media's "fake news" claims

The release of a secretly recorded video of a CNN producer on Tuesday has amplified criticism.

Lockdown lifted at Alabama military post after reports of "possible active shooter"

The Redstone Arsenal was briefly on lockdown Tuesday.

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Here's what New York's first official LGBTQ monument will look like

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

How will Trump's travel ban be enforced? Here's what the Supreme Court's decision really means.

The Supreme Court's order prevents most of the ban from taking effect before the case is heard, with limited exceptions.

Tick saliva could be the key to fighting a dangerous heart condition

Ticks could hold the secret to treating this heart condition.

CNN retraction and undercover video feeds into pro-Trump media's "fake news" claims

The release of a secretly recorded video of a CNN producer on Tuesday has amplified criticism.

Lockdown lifted at Alabama military post after reports of "possible active shooter"

The Redstone Arsenal was briefly on lockdown Tuesday.