Mike Pence denies existence of institutional racism during vice presidential debate

Source: AP
Source: AP

During a back-and-forth about race and policing in America at Tuesday's vice presidential debate, Republican VP nominee Mike Pence asserted that there is no "implicit bias or institutional racism" in America — even in the wake of a spate of police killings of unarmed African-Americans.

"Enough of this seeking every opportunity to demean law enforcement by making accusations of implicit bias every time tragedy occurs," Pence said at Virginia's Longwood University.


Democratic nominee Tim Kaine expressed shock that Pence would deny there is any bias against minorities in America.

Moderator Elaine Quijano piped in to push Pence on his claim that there was no bias against black Americans, bringing up African-American Sen. Tim Scott's past comments that he has been "targeted for nothing more than being just [himself.]"

"I have the deepest respect for Sen. Scott. He is a friend. I would say that we need to adopt criminal justice reform nationally," Pence said.

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Emily C. Singer

Emily C. Singer, née Cahn, is a senior writer for Mic covering politics. She is based in New York and can be reached at esinger@mic.com

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