Laverne Cox is on the new cover of 'Variety,' and she's speaking her anti-violence truth

Laverne Cox is on the new cover of 'Variety,' and she's speaking her anti-violence truth
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Laverne Cox is one of five women gracing the cover of Variety's "Power of Women" issue, and she's putting the issue of anti-LGBTQ violence front and center, specifically violence against transgender women.

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Cox joins Ava DuVernay, Scarlett Johansson, Miley Cyrus and Helen Mirren, who each have covers for the issue. The award-winning actress uses her moment in the spotlight to highlight her advocacy with the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs, a network of groups across the country that catalogue and work to end violence against LGBTQ communities. 

"What's so exciting about the work NCAVP does is it's also about changing the narrative of who LGBTQ people are," Cox said about the work that's documented the dozens of murders of transgender women over the years. 

And when we begin to change the narrative, then we reduce violence against those communities. And so much of that narrative comes from data collection. For years they've been the only agency tracking violence against the LGBTQ community. It is vital, vital work the NCAVP is doing to change the narrative, to change policy, to change lives.

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Jamilah King

Jamilah King is a senior staff writer at Mic. She was previously an editor at Colorlines.

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