Donald Trump is melting down in real time on Twitter — a glimpse of what's to come

Source: AP
Source: AP

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's campaign may be falling apart at the seams, but he's been kind enough to narrate the entire debacle for the public in real time on Twitter.

In the past 24 hours, Trump has busied himself lashing out at the media, "disloyal" fellow Republicans including Speaker of the House Paul Ryan and Sen. John McCain and alluded to polls showing he was performing poorly. Trump also congratulated himself for liberating himself from his "shackles" and continuing to fight, despite being stabbed in the back by his own party.

Trump continued to chastise other members of his party for abandoning him in the wake of the Washington Post's release of a 2005 video in which the now-candidate, apparently unaware he was on a hot mic, bragged about kissing and groping women without their consent. 

"Disloyal R's are far more difficult than Crooked Hillary," he wrote. "They come at you from all sides. They don't know how to win — I will teach them!"

Unfortunately for the real estate mogul, the situation is considerably more dire than his self-aggrandizing Twitter spree would otherwise indicate. Republicans are fleeing Trump because supporting his toxic campaign has become an untenable position. Trump's recent stumbles alone include the Washington Post tape, investigations into his signature family charity, crumbling relations with his own V.P. nominee Indiana Gov. Mike Pence and a series of weak (and lie-filled) debate performances against Democrat Hillary Clinton.

Then there's the polls: Trump has collapsed to double-digit margins behind Clinton, according to some recent surveys, and he has only himself to blame. While GOP officials like Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus are reassuring party members everything is fine, the time bomb is still ticking.

Trump may now be tweeting as though he sees the writing on the wall. But the tweets are also a preview as to how he will react if come Nov. 8 his opponent gets elected president — by claiming the election was stolen, he was beset by enemies within and without, and by burning whatever is left of the GOP down with him.

That, or in the increasingly unlikely event he wins, his victory speech will blame the entire GOP for trying to prevent the inevitable. Either way, Trump is providing a good look at what lies ahead for his campaign.

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Tom McKay

Tom is a staff writer at Mic, covering national politics, media, policing and the war on drugs. He is based in New York and can be reached at tmckay@mic.com.

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