2 Des Moines police officers were killed — so people naturally blamed Black Lives Matter

2 Des Moines police officers were killed — so people naturally blamed Black Lives Matter
Source: AP
Source: AP

Before police in Des Moines, Iowa, announced the name of the alleged shooter who killed two police officers early Wednesday morning, some social media users were quick to point the finger at the Black Lives Matter movement.

But they couldn't be more wrong — police said Scott Michael Greene, 46, was being sought in connection to the ambush-style assault on the two officers. Greene surrendered to officers and was in the custody of state officials at around 9 a.m. local time.

However, in a statement about the shooting Wednesday, Des Moines police spokesman Sgt. Paul Parizek said that people with "not-so-positive views of law enforcement" were to blame for "clear and present danger to police officers."

"We're very well aware of the society that we're living in right now and the time," Parizek said, without name-checking BLM.

In 2016, the ambush of police officers in Dallas, Texas, and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, reignited a debate about whether BLM, the anti-police brutality movement started in 2013, has inspired those and other law enforcement tragedies. In July, deaths of those officers followed nationwide protests over the police shooting deaths of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling.

Experts long ago debunked the idea that BLM and any other organization affiliated with the Movement for Black Lives are terrorists or a hate group. Instead, organizations like the Southern Poverty Law Center say white nationalists are the culprits of the vast majority of domestic terror acts in the U.S.

While some are willing to ignore those facts, other social media users were keen on pointing out the absurdity of blaming BLM for the ambush of police in Des Moines.

It's pretty safe to say that Twitter user @westadvocate will be waiting a long time for that apology.

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Aaron Morrison

Aaron is a Senior Staff Writer for The Movement at Mic. He covers the intersection of race, justice, politics, diversity and civil rights. He has previously written for IB TImes, Miami Herald, The Bergen Record of New Jersey and the Associated Press. Send tips to aaron@mic.com.

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