Boynton Beach, Florida, mosque was defaced with racist and Islamophobic graffiti

Source: Twitter
Source: Twitter

A mosque in Boynton Beach, Florida, was vandalized with racial and anti-Muslim epithets in black spray paint on Wednesday.

The entrance of the sign of the Alamin Center was defaced with "Fuck Islam" and "Fuck ISIS."  The Palm Beach County sheriff's office is currently investigating the crime and has not yet responded to Mic's request for comment.

This anti-Muslim incident occurred only three days after Islamophobic remarks were written on the door of a dorm belonging to two Muslim students at Brown College at the University of Virginia, according to the Cavalier Daily. "Terrorist" was written on their door in lead pencil.

Targeted attacks against mosques have quadrupled from 2014 to 2015. In fact, according to the Council of American Islamic Relations, 2016 is on track to being one of the worst years for anti-mosque incidents. As of mid-September 2016, excluding threats and protests, there were about 55 reported anti-mosque incidents. To put that number in perspective, there were a total of 79 reported anti-mosque incidents for the whole year of 2015. In 2014, there were only 20 reported incidents.

This incident in Florida is another example of the plight and alienation Muslim Americans face. Wilfredo Amr Ruiz, CAIR-Florida spokesman, alluded that the xenophobia in this presidential election has been "fueling" these anti-Muslim incidents.

"Our community continues to suffer from an increase in hate crimes and hate incidents," Ruiz said in a statement, according to local ABC affiliate WPLG. "We still have fresh in our memories the recent hate crime committed at the Islamic Center of Fort Pierce that was attacked by an arsonist."

"The hate speech and rhetoric that has come along this presidential campaign is fueling these type of crimes that endanger not only the Muslim community, but the Florida community in general," Ruiz added.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Sarah A. Harvard

Sarah is a staff writer covering religion, race and politics. Her work has appeared in The Guardian, The Atlantic, Slate, The Huffington Post, TeenVogue, and VICE. Send tips and feedback: sharvard@mic.com

MORE FROM

Charleena Lyles was a "powerful lady" — until she faced Seattle's flawed criminal justice system

Like Charleena Lyles, women who experience mental health instabilities have been more likely than men to encounter a criminal justice system that is ill-equipped to treat them.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.

Charleena Lyles was a "powerful lady" — until she faced Seattle's flawed criminal justice system

Like Charleena Lyles, women who experience mental health instabilities have been more likely than men to encounter a criminal justice system that is ill-equipped to treat them.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.