White supremacist Thomas Mair found guilty of killing anti-Brexit lawmaker Jo Cox

White supremacist Thomas Mair found guilty of killing anti-Brexit lawmaker Jo Cox
Source: AP
Source: AP

On Wednesday, white supremacist Thomas Mair was found guilty in the killing of British lawmaker Jo Cox. According to NBC News, prosecutors are calling the crime an "act of terrorism."

Mair fatally shot and stabbed Cox — a member of the Labour Party who had been vocal in her opposition to Brexit — when Cox was visiting her West Yorkshire constituents in June. Mair reportedly shouted "Britain first!" before attacking Cox.

Mair's trial revealed he had frequented neo-Nazi and Ku Klux Klan websites, kept books on the Holocaust and the German military, cut out newspaper articles on a Norwegian mass killer and displayed "a gold Third Reich Eagle ornament with a swastika" in his home on a shelf, according to NBC News.

Despite Mair's shouts of British loyalty, the judge presiding over his case emphasized that he was "no patriot" and that his "actions had betrayed this country," according to a tweet from ITV reporter Katie Oscroft. 

According to a statement from the Crown Persecution Service, Mair was sentenced to life.

The agency's head of special crime and counter terrorism, Sue Hemming, said in the statement, "The CPS will continue to work with criminal justice partners to combat those who seek to sow hatred and division by advancing extremist ideologies."

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Marie Solis

Marie is a staff writer with a focus in feminist issues. Her writing has appeared in Gothamist and the Awl. You can reach her at marie@mic.com.

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