Donald Trump is defending his call with Taiwan's president over Twitter

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

President-elect Donald Trump has defended his phone call with president of Taiwan Tsai Ing-wen in two tweets Friday night that will likely reaffirm the concerns for the real estate mogul's temperament as commander in chief. 

In the first, Trump clarified the Taiwanese president "called me," using all caps (we assume for emphasis), saying the call was a congratulatory message for Trump after winning the election. In a follow-up tweet, Trump said he found it "interesting how the U.S. sells Taiwan billions of dollars of military equipment but I should not accept a congratulatory call." 

Taiwanese media is reporting the Trump team initiated the call, but regardless of who the call came from, it could potentially incite backlash from China for its "One-China policy" with the United States. For the agreement, started by former President Jimmy Carter in 1978, the U.S. acknowledges Beijing as China's only center of power, excluding Taiwan and its capital Taipei. 

In response to Trump's call with the Taiwanese president, China's state-run CCTV issued a statement saying the president-elect made "an unprecedented break with the One-China policy and accepted US-Mainland protocol" and the country "firmly opposes official contact in any form between Washington and Taipei."

Trump's phone call, and corresponding tweets, have brought newfound concerns on how Trump's four years in office could pan out. Many expressed these thoughts on Twitter — some of which centered on Trump's apparent business interests in Taiwan conflicting with his responsibilities as president. 

Though it's been echoed in the past, perhaps the president-elect should finally delete his account.  

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Miles Surrey

Miles is a staff writer at Mic, covering culture. He is based in New York and can be reached at miles@mic.com.

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