Bill Gates is pledging to fight climate change. Is the Trump meeting a big contradiction?

Source: AP
Source: AP

Bill Gates, co-founder of Microsoft, is fighting climate change with an investment of $1 billion. Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft, reportedly accepted an invitation to attend Donald Trump's "technology roundtable" on Wednesday. Trump said on Saturday that "nobody knows" if climate change is real. 

It's real.

Gates will serve as chairman of Breakthrough Energy Ventures, a new clean energy investment fund that aims to invest over $1 billion to "finance emerging energy breakthroughs that can deliver affordable and reliable zero carbon emissions," according to a press release.

This is an undertaking the president-elect would likely view as a waste of money, considering his skepticism of climate change. Which puts into question why Nadella is choosing to accept an invitation to Trump's meeting this week. Gates' initiative shows that tech leaders don't have to accept a seat at the table to continue to drive the progress they wish to see.

Will Nadella tell Trump that climate change is real and point to his colleague's $1 billion dollar investment to combat it? That's yet to be determined — Microsoft has not publicly commented on why it's reportedly attending Trump's meetings — but the Microsoft CEO congratulated the president-elect in November, stating that the company would work with the administration.

"Yesterday we witnessed the democratic process in action here in the U.S.," Nadella wrote in a LinkedIn post

The results are of importance around the world, and I know that interest is shared among Microsoft employees. We congratulate the president-elect, and look forward to working with all those elected yesterday. Our commitment to our mission and values are steadfast, and in particular fostering a diverse and inclusive culture.

But some in the tech world raise an eyebrow at a company's ability to work alongside an administration that has spewed racist, misogynistic and discriminatory rhetoric while also preserving their public commitments to diversity.

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Melanie Ehrenkranz

Melanie is a writer covering technology and the future. She can be reached at melanie@mic.com.

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