Mike Flynn "inappropriately shared" classified info, exposing himself as major hypocrite

Mike Flynn "inappropriately shared" classified info, exposing himself as major hypocrite
Source: AP
Source: AP

Retired Army Gen. Mike Flynn, whom President-elect Donald Trump tapped as his national security adviser, "inappropriately shared" classified information with foreign military advisers while he was serving in Afghanistan, the Washington Post reported Wednesday morning.

According to the Washington Post, Flynn was investigated for sharing information he was not permitted to share about U.S. activities in Afghanistan with British and Australian allies. The 2010 investigation into Flynn's behavior did not result in any disciplinary action, as it concluded that Flynn didn't act "knowingly" and "there was no actual or potential damage to national security as a result," according to the Washington Post

But the new revelations expose Flynn as a hypocrite, as he was one of the loudest critics of Hillary Clinton and her use of a private email server when she served as Secretary of State.

Flynn said Clinton should be in jail for her actions, and called on her to drop out of the race.

"If I, a guy who knows this business, if I did a tenth, a tenth of what she did, I would be in jail today," Flynn said during his speech at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, leading to loud chants of "lock her up." 

According to the Washington Post's report, this was not the only time Flynn inappropriately shared classified information. 

In "late 2009 or early 2010" Flynn divulged information about United States intelligence's monitoring of an insurgent group in Afghanistan to Pakistani officials, which earned Flynn a reprimanding from now-Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, the Washington Post reported.

Flynn, who was forced to retire from the military in 2014, has had his fair share of controversy since Trump selected him to serve as national security adviser.

He's shared false conspiracy theories on Twitter, including one about "Pizzagate," the false Internet-fueled rumor about a child sex ring at a Washington, D.C., pizza joint that led a gunman to fire shots in the restaurant.

Flynn does not need Senate approval to serve as national security adviser.