Trump was supposed to outline his conflicts of interest. All we got was this lousy tweet.

Trump was supposed to outline his conflicts of interest. All we got was this lousy tweet.
Source: AP
Source: AP

President-elect Donald Trump was supposed to hold a "major news conference" Thursday in New York, in which he was going to answer questions about the massive conflicts of interest he may face between his own business interests and the interests of the United States when he's sworn in as president on Jan. 20.

Instead — after Trump announced earlier this week that the press conference was delayed until January — all concerned citizens got was a tweet in which Trump dismissed the severity of his potential conflicts, giving few details and subjecting himself to zero scrutiny from the press on the subject.

"The media tries so hard to make my move to the White House, as it pertains to my business, so complex — when actually it isn't!" Trump tweeted this morning.

His tweet comes a day after Trump held a roundtable with leaders of the top tech companies in the world, a meeting that his children — Donald Trump Jr., Ivanka Trump and Eric Trump — sat in on.

His children's presence at the meeting raises concerns that he is not taking his conflicts of interest seriously, given that he's tasked them with running his business interests while he serves as president.

By getting access to that meeting and those major business players, as well as reportedly sitting in on Cabinet secretary meetings, that leaves his children with the same conflict of interest issues Trump has. And entanglements of this sort make his hand-off of his business to his children look largely ceremonial, rather than actually addressing conflict of interest issues.

Trump canceled the news conference on his conflicts of interest on Monday. Trump said the news conference would be rescheduled for "in the near future."

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Emily C. Singer

Emily C. Singer, née Cahn, is a senior writer for Mic covering politics. She is based in New York and can be reached at esinger@mic.com

MORE FROM

Trump asked his advisers about his ability to pardon his family and himself

Trump is reportedly looking for ways to block Mueller's investigation and is concerned that Mueller will look at his tax returns.

Prominent alt-right troll responds to ADL’s hate designation with Auschwitz video

The provocateur used the famous Nazi death camp to warn the Jewish civil rights group about hate.

Bernie Sanders makes first move against a bill with bipartisan support that could increase fracking

"Our job is to move away from fossil fuels toward sustainable energy and energy efficiency. This bill does the opposite."

Betsy DeVos calls protests against her a “badge of honor”

Hundreds gathered to protest her speech before a notorious conservative group.

Report: Paul Manafort is being investigated for possible money laundering by Special Counsel Mueller

The Senate has already asked Manafort to testify in open session next week.

Experts explain why the FBI has never — and should never — report to the president

“The president perhaps isn’t a student of our history.”

Trump asked his advisers about his ability to pardon his family and himself

Trump is reportedly looking for ways to block Mueller's investigation and is concerned that Mueller will look at his tax returns.

Prominent alt-right troll responds to ADL’s hate designation with Auschwitz video

The provocateur used the famous Nazi death camp to warn the Jewish civil rights group about hate.

Bernie Sanders makes first move against a bill with bipartisan support that could increase fracking

"Our job is to move away from fossil fuels toward sustainable energy and energy efficiency. This bill does the opposite."

Betsy DeVos calls protests against her a “badge of honor”

Hundreds gathered to protest her speech before a notorious conservative group.

Report: Paul Manafort is being investigated for possible money laundering by Special Counsel Mueller

The Senate has already asked Manafort to testify in open session next week.

Experts explain why the FBI has never — and should never — report to the president

“The president perhaps isn’t a student of our history.”