A Louisiana judge just tossed an executive order that would have protected LGBTQ people

Source: AP
Source: AP

On Wednesday, a Louisiana judge overturned an executive order, issued by the state's Democratic Gov. John Bel Edwards in April, that protected LGBTQ people working in state government from workplace discrimination, the Associated Press reported. 

The State District Judge Todd Hernandez who ruled in the case called the order an "unlawful" attempt to override the state's legislators — but Edwards defended the order, which made discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity illegal in state government and any workplace with a state contract, with an exemption for contractors that are religiously affiliated, the AP reported.

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards speaks at a service for Alton Sterling in July.
Source: 
Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images

Following Hernandez's verdict, Edwards released a statement. "With great respect for the role of the Louisiana Legislature, we continue to believe that discrimination is not a Louisiana value and that we are best served as a state when employment decisions are based solely on an individual's qualifications and job performance," the statement said.

Currently, it is still legal in 32 states to fire someone or deny them services because of their gender or sexual orientation, according to the Human Rights Campaign.

Louisiana's Republican Attorney General Jeff Landry slammed the governor's "extreme agenda" and celebrated the judge's ruling. Edwards reportedly plans to appeal Hernandez's decision.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Anna Swartz

Anna is a staff writer for Mic covering breaking news. She can be reached at aswartz@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Will Justice Anthony Kennedy retire at end of Supreme Court term? Here's what we know.

Rumors that the 80-year-old swing justice may leave the bench are fueling fear of a second Trump pick on the nation's high court.

3 states and D.C. allow same flammable building materials behind Grenfell Tower fire

The causes of London's Grenfell Tower are similar to the justifications used to waive fire regulations in the U.S.

New Jersey bill would require kids to be taught how to interact with police

Students from kindergarten through 12th grade would receive the education.

UK Parliament hit with cyberattack

Members of Parliament had difficulty accessing their emails Saturday in the wake of the attack.

Istanbul LGBT pride march banned by government for safety concerns

A right-wing nationalist group has vowed to stop the protest.

Compounds seized by US in December reportedly contained material useful in Russia probe

The Trump administration has reportedly been considering returning the New York and Maryland compounds to Russia.

Will Justice Anthony Kennedy retire at end of Supreme Court term? Here's what we know.

Rumors that the 80-year-old swing justice may leave the bench are fueling fear of a second Trump pick on the nation's high court.

3 states and D.C. allow same flammable building materials behind Grenfell Tower fire

The causes of London's Grenfell Tower are similar to the justifications used to waive fire regulations in the U.S.

New Jersey bill would require kids to be taught how to interact with police

Students from kindergarten through 12th grade would receive the education.

UK Parliament hit with cyberattack

Members of Parliament had difficulty accessing their emails Saturday in the wake of the attack.

Istanbul LGBT pride march banned by government for safety concerns

A right-wing nationalist group has vowed to stop the protest.

Compounds seized by US in December reportedly contained material useful in Russia probe

The Trump administration has reportedly been considering returning the New York and Maryland compounds to Russia.