#BlackTwitterVerificationQuestions is Black Twitter's response to alt-right trolling

Source: AP
Source: AP

There's no fooling Black Twitter.

In a very racist Dec. 9 blog post called "How to Be a Nigger on Twitter," conservative website Daily Stormer publisher Andrew Anglin asked his readers to "create a state of chaos on Twitter, among the black Twitter population, by sowing distrust and suspicion." The key to this, he writes, is impersonating black people on Twitter.

The Stormer post tells users how to procure profile photos, protect them against reverse search and even how to pick a "black" Twitter name or moniker. The blog reads: 

Decide whether you want to be male or female. Female is easier, in terms of trolling, though it might be a hard character to play.
If you're not feeling creative, you can just use a standard name like "Shay," "Malita," "Jay" or "Mike." You can also just make up random stuff like "Jinky Slip," "Flex Fist" or "Goldie T." You can also use a funny black name like "D'Arnell" or "Shanika."

In response, Black Twitter began the hashtag #BlackTwitterVerificationQuestions. Users cracked jokes to deflect any alt-right attempts to bring hateration and holleration to Black Twitter's dancery

Black Twitter's responses showed that just using names like "D'Arnell" or "Shanika" is not enough if you want an invite to the party. Users must know the origins of some of Black Twitter's favorite viral memes and cultural touchstones to make the cut. Take a look at some of the best tweets. 

Some of the tweets played off of black family life and culture. 


Others recalled black movies, music, TV and memes.

Twitter user @IHateDanae told the Huffington Post that she created the hashtag as a way of "taking ownership of the Twitter experience we have created."

The original blog post attempted to reduce black people on Twitter to a set of racist caricatures. As usual, Black Twitter's response was funny and poignant: black culture, responsible for some of the best internet culture, is not easily mocked or infiltrated. 

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Mathew Rodriguez

Mathew Rodriguez is a Staff Writer at Mic. He is a queer Latino New Yorker who enjoys female rappers, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Flannery O'Connor. He is a former editor at TheBody.com and he is working on a memoir.

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