North Carolina legislators may repeal HB2, the trans bathroom law

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

After months of protests and boycotts against HB2, better known as North Carolina's "bathroom bill," state legislators may repeal the legislation in its entirety during a special session on Tuesday.

According to the Charlotte Observer, the Charlotte City Council called for the session in what the paper called a "surprise move" that has left incoming Gov. Roy Cooper feeling hopeful that he'll be able to toss out the bill his predecessor, Gov. Pat McCrory, signed into law in March. 

The legislation, which requires North Carolina residents to use the bathroom corresponding to their gender as assigned at birth and noted on their birth certificate rather than their gender identity, had been a direct affront to transgender rights and put the safety of trans and nonbinary people in jeopardy every day.

"I hope they will keep their word to me and with the help of Democrats in the legislature, HB2 will be repealed in full," Cooper said in a statement reported on by the Observer on Monday.

He continued, "Full repeal will help to bring jobs, sports and entertainment events back and will provide the opportunity for strong LGBT protections in our state."


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article121729973.html#storylink=cpy

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Marie Solis

Marie is a Slay staff writer with focuses in culture and class. Her writing has appeared in Gothamist and the Awl. You can reach her at marie@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Charleena Lyles was a "powerful lady" — until she faced Seattle's flawed criminal justice system

Like Charleena Lyles, women who experience mental health instabilities have been more likely than men to encounter a criminal justice system that is ill-equipped to treat them.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.

Charleena Lyles was a "powerful lady" — until she faced Seattle's flawed criminal justice system

Like Charleena Lyles, women who experience mental health instabilities have been more likely than men to encounter a criminal justice system that is ill-equipped to treat them.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.