Where is the president inaugurated?

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

The inauguration of the president of the United States takes place on the west lawn of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C. President-elect Donald Trump will be sworn in at precisely 12 p.m. Eastern Jan. 20, with Vice President-elect Mike Pence taking his oath of office just before. 

Why is the president inaugurated at the Capitol? 

President Barack Obama is inaugurated on the Capitol steps for the second time in 2013.
Source: 
Rob Carr/Getty Images

As stated by the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies, the first inauguration that took place at the Capitol building was that of Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson's ceremony was held indoors, but beginning with Andrew Jackson's inauguration in 1829, presidents were sworn in on the east front of the Capitol so spectators could watch. 

Ronald Regan's inauguration in 1981 was the first held on the west front of the Capitol to help minimize construction costs and to give more spectators the chance to watch the ceremony. 

Who builds the platform?

Building materials for the inauguration platform
Source: 
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP


The Architect of the Capitol (AOC) erects the platform on the Capitol's west front and assembles the seating, fencing and any other physical arrangements necessary for the ceremony. The AOC is a federal agency charged with the preservation, maintenance and development of the Capitol Complex. 

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Julia Tilford

Julia Tilford is a news writer for Mic.com.

MORE FROM

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.