Texas mom reports to police that a white man allegedly choked her son. They arrest her.

Texas mom reports to police that a white man allegedly choked her son. They arrest her.

Imagine calling for help for your 7-year-old son and ending up in the back of a squad car. 

That's what happened to a Fort Worth, Texas, mom when she called the police to seek justice for her son, who had allegedly been choked by an older white man after he littered, The Root reported. 

A Facebook video uploaded on Wednesday evening shows a Texas woman, whom people on social media identified as Jacqueline Craig, explaining to the officer why she called him. Allegedly, an older white man in the background of the video saw her son litter, asked him to pick it up and when the boy did not comply, he began to choke the boy.

The officer, disregarding the story, asks, "Why don't you teach your son not to litter?" 

"He can't prove to me that my son littered, but it doesn't matter if he did or didn't," Craig says in the video. "It doesn't give him the right to put his hands on him."

The officer responds to Craig: "Why not?" 

Craig's voice gets louder as she tries to speak to the officer, who has made assumptions about her parenting. After the officer asks her why she's yelling, Craig explains that he's "pissed [her] off" by questioning her parenting skills. 

He responds, "If you keep yelling at me, you're going to piss me off and I'm going to take you to jail." 

The woman's daughter, whom The Root identified as Brea Hymond, tries to get between the officer and Craig. The officer pushes the young girl out of the way, grabs Craig and brings her to the ground with force. Then he presses a stun gun into her back and eventually points the stun gun at Hymond. 

During the entire incident, the man who choked the 7-year-old boy stands by and watches. The officer eventually handcuffs Craig and Hymond and takes them away in his vehicle. 

Unfortunately, the ongoing police brutality epidemic in the United States can make any interaction with law enforcement a scary one. And stories like Craig's are not uncommon. Sometimes, calling the police for help or to report another person's bad behavior gets black people handcuffed and sent to jail. Earlier this year, a black Houston woman feared an officer who stopped her so much, she called for another police officer to come talk to her. The officer arrested her for resisting arrest. 

The Fort Worth Police Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment.