New Years celebrations and traditions around the world

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

In a few days, you'll salute the coming of 2017 with a toast, a kiss and perhaps a few lines of "Auld Lang Syne."

But how will people all around the world mark the new year?

Here are some traditions from around the world to incorporate into your own celebration this year:

Eat 12 grapes

People celebrate the new year in Spain.
Source: 
Alvaro Hurtado/AP

In Spain, it is tradition to eat 12 grapes at the stroke of midnight to ensure good luck for the 12 months that lie ahead. Wearing red underwear on New Year's Eve is also a Spanish way to ensure a lucky new year.

Burn an effigy

In Ecuador, effigies are burned to symbolize the burning of the old year.
Source: 
Juan Cevallos/Getty Images

Burning politicians and pop culture figures in effigy is a New Year's Eve tradition in Ecuador said to date back to 1895. The tradition symbolizes the burning of the old year and cleansing it of all the bad that happened during it. 

Grab your suitcase

People in Colombia prepare for New Year's Eve.
Source: 
Guillermo Legaria/Getty Images

Want to do some traveling in 2017? Do as the Colombians do and carry an empty suitcase around the block. 

Have a feast

People celebrate the new year in the Philippines.
Source: 
Bullit Marquez/AP

In many countries, it's common to enjoy a large feast on New Year's Eve. For instance, the Philippines rings in the new year with a midnight feast called "Media Noche."

Watch some fireworks

People watch fireworks from a beach in Rio de Janeiro on New Year's Eve.
Source: 
Mauro Pimentel/AP

Fireworks are common in New Year's Eve celebrations around the world for a reason. Not only are they beautiful, but the Chinese tradition began as a way of warding off evil spirits in the new year. There are massive New Year's Eve fireworks displays around the world in cities like Las Vegas, Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro and Sydney.

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Eric Lutz

Eric is a staff writer covering news for Mic. He lives in Chicago and can be reached at ericlutz@mic.com.

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