Lindsay Lohan's Instagram bio says "Alaikum salam" and Muslims are welcoming her to Islam

Source: Getty Images / Twitter

Muslims around the world are welcoming a new sister to their religion — Lindsay Lohan — whom they believe has converted to Islam.

After Lohan wiped her Instagram account clean and wrote "Alaikum salam" in her bio, Muslims started tweeting messages of congratulations to the actress. Alaikum Salaam is an Islamic greeting that translates to "and unto you peace" in Arabic. 

Within the last year, Lohan has spent a lot of time in the United Arab Emirates, specifically in Dubai. Lohan also traveled to Turkey to volunteer and be an advocate for refugees. She also went on the Turkish TV show Habertürk to speak about the immense backlash she faced in the United States for embracing Islam. 


"They crucified me for it in America," Lohan said. "They made me seem like Satan. I was a bad person for holding that Quran."

Lohan said she befriended a lot of friends who are Saudi when she moved to London and one of them gave her the Quran she was pictured holding. 

"I was so happy to leave [America] and go back to London after that, because I felt so unsafe in my own country," Lohan added. "If this [Islam] is something that I want to learn, this is my own will."

On Twitter, Muslims are taking pride in Lohan's exploration of Islam. Many have publicly, and perhaps prematurely, welcomed the actress with Islamic expressions of Alhamdulillah ("Praise be to God"), Subhanallah ("Glory be to God") and Mashallah ("God has willed it"). One Twitter user predicted Lohan would convert to Islam before President-elect Donald Trump is inaugurated.

If Lohan ends up actually converting to Islam, she would not be the first celebrity to do so. Cat Stevens, Mike Tyson, Ice Cube and Muhammad Ali all converted to Islam during the prime of their careers.

Lohan's representative has not yet responded to Mic's request for comment.

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Sarah A. Harvard

Sarah is a staff writer covering religion, race and politics. Her work has appeared in The Guardian, The Atlantic, Slate, The Huffington Post, TeenVogue, and VICE. Send tips and feedback: sharvard@mic.com

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