Women's March on Washington may also be the nation's largest gathering of people with disabilities

Women's March on Washington may also be the nation's largest gathering of people with disabilities
Members of the 2016 United States Summer Paralympic Team arrive at the White House in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, in front of the West Wing, for a ceremony where President Barack Obama will honor the 2016 United States Summer Olympic and Paralymp
Source: Andrew Harnik/AP
Members of the 2016 United States Summer Paralympic Team arrive at the White House in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, in front of the West Wing, for a ceremony where President Barack Obama will honor the 2016 United States Summer Olympic and Paralymp
Source: Andrew Harnik/AP

Along with issues like the United States economy and immigration, disability rights became a focus of the 2016 election cycle, especially after President Donald Trump mocked Serge Kovaleski, a reporter living with a disability. 

That focus will continue into Saturday's Women's March on Washington, according to reporting by Vox. Ted Jackson, logistics team accessibility lead for the Women's March, told the outlet that turnout among people with disabilities will be "massive," with estimates saying at least 45,000 protesters with disabilities are expected to attend the rally.

Jackson added that this would exceed prior counts of significant demonostrations on record, including the 8,500 advocates who attended a rally after the Senate passed the Americans With Disabilities Act. 

Mia Ives-Rublee, the founder and coordinator of the Women's March on Washington's Disability Caucus, told Vox that the ADA, combined with Trump's rhetoric around peopel with disabilities, has mobilized the community. 

Anastasia Somoza speaks of disability rights during the first day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Monday, July 25, 2016. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Source: J. Scott Applewhite/AP

"People with disabilities got so much visibility during the 2016 campaign," she said. "To have someone [like Trump] totally ignore our needs and priorities is a step back, and they will stay active even after [the inauguration]."

Though Jackson estimated about 45,000 people with disabilities will attend the march, he did not clarify how he arrived at that number. The Women's March on Washington did not immediately reply to a request for comment.