Dippin' Dots CEO had the perfect warm response to Sean Spicer's icy tweets

Source: AP
Source: AP

The CEO of Dippin' Dots — the flash-frozen "ice cream of the future" that social media users recently discovered was the subject of a one-sided, five-year Twitter feud with White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer — has fired back.

On at least four separate occasions over five years, Spicer mocked Dippin' Dots' tagline, and in one case, posted a link to a Wall Street Journal article about Dippin' Dots filing for bankruptcy.

After numerous users shared Spicer's posts amid President Donald Trump's inauguration festivities (and counter-protests) over the weekend, Dippin' Dots CEO Scott Fischer penned an open letter Monday.

"Dear Sean, we understand that ice cream is a serious matter," Fischer wrote. "And running out of your favorite flavor can feel like a national emergency! We've seen your tweets and would like to be friends rather than foes. After all, we believe in connecting the dots.

"As you may or may not know, Dippin' Dots are made in Kentucky by hundreds of hard-working Americans in the heartland of our great country. As a company, we're doing great. We've enjoyed double-digit growth in sales for the past three years. That means we're creating jobs and opportunities. We hear that's on your agenda too."

"We can even afford to treat the White House and press corps to an ice cream social," Fischer concluded. "What do you say? We'll make sure there's plenty of all your favorite flavors."

It's not exactly the first time an administration comment about foodstuff has drawn a response from the food industry.

In 1990, then-President George H.W. Bush declared he hated broccoli, spurring the United Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Association to send two fresh truckloads of the vegetable to the White House.

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Tom McKay

Tom is a staff writer at Mic, covering national politics, media, policing and the war on drugs. He is based in New York and can be reached at tmckay@mic.com.

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