It took last 5 presidents years before half of Americans disapproved of them. It took Trump 8 days.

ARLINGTON, VA - JANUARY 27: U.S. President Donald Trump signs executive orders in the Hall of Heroes at the Department of Defense on January 27, 2017 in Arlington, Virginia. Trump signed two orders calling for the 'great rebuilding' of the nation's militar
Source: Pool/Getty Images
ARLINGTON, VA - JANUARY 27: U.S. President Donald Trump signs executive orders in the Hall of Heroes at the Department of Defense on January 27, 2017 in Arlington, Virginia. Trump signed two orders calling for the 'great rebuilding' of the nation's militar
Source: Pool/Getty Images

For many of us, a job review comes up once or twice a year. When you're the president of the United States, it happens every day. And it looks like Donald Trump needs to improve his job performance stat. 

According to the latest Gallup poll, after only eight days on the job, Trump's disapproval rating reached 51%. That same day, protests erupted across U.S. airports following Trump's executive order effectively banning Muslim refugees. 

That Trump has become so disliked so quickly is something of a record. 

A look back at Gallup polling for previous presidents shows that it took them quite some time before more than half of the nation thought they were handling its highest office poorly. 

President Ronald Reagan
Source: J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Ronald Reagan reached 54% unpopularity on Jan. 16, 1983, his 727th day in office. His unpopularity stemmed mostly to lingering mistrust from 1982, when the U.S. economy had soured, according to Gallup

U.S. President George H. Bush
Source: Rick Bowner/AP

George H. W. Bush lasted a long time before his disapproval ratings went higher than half. On Feb. 29, 1992, his 1,136th day in office, Bush had a 53% disapproval rating. During that time, Bush was facing a heavy primary battle from Pat Buchanan, and the Republican party was deeply divided. 

President Bill Clinton
Source: Cliff Schiappa/AP

President Bill Clinton lasted 573 days in office before more than half the country ended its love affair with him. On Aug. 15, 1994, as his health care initiative was collapsing, his disapproval rating jumped to 52%

President George W. Bush (right)
Source: TIM SLOAN/Getty Images

On May 8, 2004, day 1,205 of George W. Bush's presidency, a majority of America did not approve of him for the first time — 51% to be exact. During that time, America was still in Iraq and stories of torture carried out by U.S. soldiers had come to light.

President Barack Obama
Source: Charles Dharapak/AP

President Barack Obama lost the confidence of half the country on Aug. 13, 2011, his 936th day in office. On that day, 52% of people disapproved of his work. At the time, Obama was dealing with a debt ceiling crisis

It's hard to point to any one day in the presidency and see why a person might be deeply unpopular. Unless of course that day is Jan. 28, 2017, when there were only eight days worth of reasons to point to as evidence. 

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Mathew Rodriguez

Mathew Rodriguez is a Staff Writer at Mic. He is a queer Latino New Yorker who enjoys female rappers, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Flannery O'Connor. He is a former editor at TheBody.com and he is working on a memoir.

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