Trump says his Muslim ban is keeping out "bad dudes." Here's what those bad dudes actually look like

Source: Hassan Ammar/AP

President Donald Trump says he's protecting you from "bad dudes."

In response to nationwide protests objecting to Trump's immigration ban signed Friday, the president began the week by posting a tweet reaffirming his support for his executive order Monday morning. 

"If the ban were announced with a one week notice, the 'bad' would rush into our country during that week," Trump wrote. "A lot of bad 'dudes' out there!"

Trump's team was tightlipped about their longstanding immigration plan — which predated the election and was kept secret.

Trump's executive order to exclude "bad dudes" applies to all refugees trying to resettle in America, as the resettlement program is halted

It refers more specifically to citizens from seven muslim-majority countries, including Syria, Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen, nearly all of whom have been temporarily barred from entering the United States. The only exception is Syria, whose refugees are banned indefinitely. The executive order is widely described by its opponents as anti-Muslim.

President Donald Trump holds up a signed Executive Order in the Oval Office of the White House, Saturday, Jan. 28, 2017 in Washington.
Source: Alex Brandon/AP

Refugees already faced an exhaustive screening process and 8 million of all refugees in the world are children and, according to UNICEF, "nearly 50 million children have been uprooted – 28 million of them driven from their homes by conflicts not of their making, and millions more migrating in the hope of finding a better, safer life." As Syria has descended into one of the worst humanitarian crises of our time, 11 million Syrians are left displaced. Parents with newborns and the elderly alike seek refuge. 

While the president insists the ban promotes national security, some politicians worry it has instead inflamed anti-American sentiment amongst radical extremists, like ISIS, which will use the ban as a recruiting tool.

The likelihood an American will get killed by a refugee in a domestic attack is around one in 3.64 billion per year, according to the Cato Institute. The chances of an undocumented immigrant killing an American in an attack is one in 10.9 billion per year. 

Conversely, 963 Americans were killed by police officers in 2016, the Washington Post reports. Meanwhile, Trump has said he will militarize and empower law enforcement.  

These numbers highlight just how misdirected the executive order ostensibly designed to promote national security is. Here are 32 images of what Trump's "bad dudes" look like. 

Iran

Iraq

A refugee child who fled the Iraqi city of Mosul due to the fighting between government forces and Islamic State (IS) group jihadists, smiles at the UN-run al-Hol refugee camp in Syria's Hasakeh province, on Jan. 29, 2017.
Source: Delil Souleiman/Getty Images
Refugees who fled the Iraqi city of Mosul due to the fighting between government forces and Islamic State (IS) group jihadists, walk carrying containers full of heating fuel at the UN-run al-Hol refugee camp in Syria's Hasakeh province, on Jan. 29, 2017.
Source: Delil Souleiman/Getty Images
A refugee boy who fled the Iraqi city of Mosul due to the fighting between government forces and Islamic State (IS) group jihadists, waits to receive aid at the UN-run al-Hol refugee camp in Syria's Hasakeh province, on Jan. 29, 2017.
Source: Delil Souleiman/Getty Images
A refugee child who fled the Iraqi city of Mosul due to the fighting between government forces and Islamic State (IS) group jihadists, walks carrying heating fuel at the UN-run al-Hol refugee camp in Syria's Hasakeh province, on Jan. 29, 2017.
Source: Delil Souleiman/Getty Images
A refugee child who fled the Iraqi city of Mosul due to the fighting between government forces and Islamic State (IS) group jihadists, looks on at the UN-run al-Hol refugee camp in Syria's Hasakeh province, on Jan. 29, 2017.
Source: Delil Souleiman/Getty Images

Libya

Worshipers attend a sermon during Eid al-Adha at the Martyrs Square in central Tripoli, Libya, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015.
Source: Mohamed Ben Khalifa/AP
Libyan children pose on Martyrs' square in the Libyan capital Tripoli on October 18, 2016.
Source: Mahmud Turkia/Getty Images
A Libyan Red Crescent worker, holds a picture that was found in a bag of belongings that washed up on a beach near the Tunisian Libyan border, not far from Zuwarah, 102 km (63 mi) west of Tripoli, Libya on Sept. 12, 2015.
Source: Mohamed Ben Khalifa/AP
In this photo taken on a government-organized tour, an elderly Libyan woman cries as she hugs a relative after a 27-hour boat ride from the rebel-held east in a port in Tripoli, Libya, on Sunday, June 26, 2011.
Source: Ivan Sekretarev/AP
A former Libyan prisoner kisses his daughter after disembarking a ferry following his evacuation from Tripoli by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in Benghazi, Libya on June 24, 2011. Three hundred Libyans, including 51 rebels held by Gadhafi troops, were returned to the rebel-held capital Benghazi on Friday.
Source: Hassan Ammar/AP

Somalia

In this photo taken on Nov. 16, 2016, Somali children who were repatriated to Somalia from Kenya's Dadaab camp, stand by their makeshift shelter in the Daryeel camp for the displaced, in Mogadishu, Somalia. Somalis say they were pressured to return to their country from the world's largest refugee camp in neighboring Kenya. They say they were promised safety and support back home. Instead, they report hunger, preying gangs and the deadly threat of attack by extremist group al-Shabab.
Source: Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP
In this Aug. 5, 2011 file photo, newly arrived Somali refugees wait outside a UNHCR processing center at the Ifo refugee camp outside Dadaab, eastern Kenya, 100 kilometers (62 miles) from the Somali border. The Kenyan government is coercing refugees to quit the world's largest refugee camp and return to Somalia where they risk getting killed or forcibly recruited into the Islamic extremist group, al-Shabab, Amnesty International said Nov. 15, 2016.
Source: Jerome Delay/AP
A Somali young girl cooks food outside her makeshift home inside a refugee camp in Mogadishu, Somalia. A Sept. 20, 2016 U.N. report says that 5 million people, more than 40% of the population in Somalia, are not getting enough food, on the chaotic Horn of Africa, and that the number of people who are food insecure has increased by 300,000 since February.
Source: Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP
In this Feb. 26, 2016 photo, local cleric and Somali refugee Imam Said Ali sits at his desk after leading worshippers in the weekly Friday Muslim prayer inside a makeshift mosque in Fort Morgan, a small town on the eastern plains of Colorado. From a young age, Said Ali spent most of his life living in a refugee camp in Kenya after his family fled the civil war in Somalia. Said Ali says that he has been made to feel welcome in the United States, and that he feels grateful to be here.
Source: Brennan Linsley/AP

Sudan

Abdul (30), and his wife Fauziah (20), asylum seekers from Sudan, sit inside their room in the Kolekta hotel, where hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers stay for years while waiting for registration and resettlement, on September 7, 2016 in Batam, Indonesia.
Source: Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images
In this Sept. 16, 2016 photo, Amna Salim Ali, left, and her husband Ezairig El Nemair stand in front of their home in New London, Conn. The Sudanese couple are among about 500 refugees being resettled this year by Integrated Refugee & Immigrant Services with the help of community organizations across the state.
Source: Pat Eaton-Robb/AP
Sudanese refugees gather to receive food aid during a visit of senior officials from the United Kingdom oversee a new cash assistance project implemented by the World Food Program at a UN refugee camp in the city of Nyala, in South Darfur, on January 9, 2017. / AFP / ASHRAF SHAZLY
Source: ASHRAF SHAZLY/Getty Images
In this picture dated Dec. 2, 2015, a Sudanese woman holds her child in a tent pitched outside the U.N. refugee agency headquarters in Amman, Jordan. Jordan plans to deport about 800 Sudanese men, women and children to Sudan, a government spokesman said Wednesday, after troops tore down the makeshift tent camp for the displaced in a pre-dawn raid.
Source: RAAD ADAYLEH/AP

Syria

A Syrian family waits to register at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees headquarters, in Beirut, Lebanon, on Jan. 30, 2017. By executive order, U.S. President Donald Trump imposed a 90-day ban Friday, that affects travel to the U.S. by citizens of Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen and puts an indefinite hold on a program resettling Syrian refugees.
Source: Hassan Ammar/AP
Hundred of Syrian families wait to register at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees headquarters, in Beirut, Lebanon, on Jan. 30, 2017. By executive order, U.S. President Donald Trump imposed a 90-day ban Friday, that affects travel to the U.S. by citizens of Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen and puts an indefinite hold on a program resettling Syrian refugees.
Source: Hassan Ammar/AP
Haya, a 13 year-old Syrian refugee from Homs, plays with balloons upon her arrival at Rome's Fiumicino International Airport on Jan. 30, 2017. Italian government and church officials have welcomed 41 Syrian refugees at Rome's airport, saying they wanted to show solidarity at a time when the United States is sending refugees away and building walls to keep them out.
Source: Alessandra Tarantino/AP
A Syrian woman and her kids remove the snow from the entrance of their tent at an informal refugee camp in the eastern Lebanese town of Marj near the border with Syria, Lebanon, on Jan. 28, 2017. President Donald Trump has barred all refugees from entering the United States for four months, and indefinitely halted any from Syria, saying the ban is needed to keep out "radical Islamic terrorists."
Source: Hussein Malla/AP
Syrian refugees sit during an official welcome ceremony at Rome's Fiumicino International Airport, Jan. 30, 2017. Italian government and church officials have welcomed 41 Syrian refugees at Rome's airport, saying they wanted to show solidarity at a time when the United States is sending refugees away and building walls to keep them out.
Source: Alessandra Tarantino/AP
Syrian children play in the snow, at an informal refugee camp in the eastern Lebanese town of Marj near the border with Syria, Lebanon, Jan. 28, 2017. In an executive order Friday, Trump suspended all refugee admissions to the U.S. for four months and banned the entry of Syrian refugees indefinitely, pending a security review of the admissions program.
Source: Hussein Malla/AP

Yemen

In this May 19, 2015 photo, Ashwaq, 12, from Yemen, stands outside her family's tent at the Markaze refugee camp in Obock, northern Djibouti. Forty percent of children from five conflict-scarred Middle Eastern countries are not in school, the U.N. child welfare agency said in a report Sept. 3, 2015, warning of a lost generation and a dim future for the region. UNICEF said 13.7 million out of 34 million school age children in Syria, Iraq, Yemen, Libya and Sudan are not getting an education, almost double the number five years ago.
Source: Mosa'ab Elshamy/AP
Yemenis gather at a shop that sells firewood, used for cooking purposes as gas prices remain high, in the capital Sanaa on Jan. 18, 2017.
Source: Mohammed Huwais/Getty Images
In this May 19, 2015 photo, Ibrahim Mohamed, 80, and the oldest refugee at the center, who is both blind and deaf, adjusts his hat, at an orphanage that has been turned into a center for Yemeni refugees, in Obock, northern Djibouti. Fleeing the war at home, thousands of Yemenis have made it across the Gulf of Aden to find refuge in Djibouti, a sleepy Horn of Africa nation where the United Nations has set up a staging hub for aid for the conflict-torn Arab country.
Source: Mosa'ab Elshamy/AP
In this May 20, 2015 photo, Yemeni refugees listen to the news on the radio outside their room at an orphanage that has been turned into a center for Yemeni refugees in Obock, northern Djibouti. There are no doors or windows on the tiny buildings of the orphanage and the Yemenis have put up curtains between the rooms for privacy. They spend the day mostly hanging out around the well in the yard but they say it's still better than the UNHCR-run Markaze camp about 300 tents in the open desert.
Source: Mosa'ab Elshamy/AP

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Natasha Noman

Natasha is a News Staff Writer covering global affairs. She previously reported on regional affairs from Pakistan. Natasha is based in New York and can be reached at natasha@mic.com.

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