Wegmans continues to stock Trump wines despite customer boycotts

Wegmans continues to stock Trump wines despite customer boycotts

Another day, another company getting dragged into the political sphere as some Americans protest against anything and everything Trump-related. Shopping is a political act. 

Caught in the crosshairs this week is oft-beloved grocery chain Wegmans. Consumers are calling on Wegmans — which has 92 stores throughout the Northeast United States — to remove Trump wines from shelves, the Washington Post reported. 

"Certainly if Wegmans is carrying Trump wines, I personally will not shop there," Terry O'Neill, president of the National Organization for Women, told the Washington Post. Members of NOW are planning to put pressure on the grocery chain to drop the wine. 

Wegmans currently sells five wines from the Trump Winery, a winery located on a 1,300-acre estate in Virginia. The offered wines include: Trump Winery Meritage, Trump Blanc de Blanc, Trump Winery Chardonnay, Trump Winery Cru Fortified Chardonnay and Trump Winery Sauvignon Blanc. 

Here's what they look like on Wegmans' site: 

"Individual shoppers who feel strongly about an issue can demonstrate their convictions by refusing to buy a product," Jo Natale, vice president of media relations for Wegmans, told the Washington Post. "When enough people do the same, and sales of a product drop precipitously, we stop selling that product in favor of one that’s in greater demand."

Twitter users had mixed reactions to the news that Wegmans wasn't planning on removing Trump Wines from stores:

Wegmans has been stocking wine from the Trump Winery since 2008 — even before Trump acquired it, the Post noted. While many Trump products are not made in the United States, the Virginia-based Trump Winery is one of few exceptions. 

But that might not matter to some Americans. Immense pressure from consumers caused Nordstrom to drop Ivanka Trump's fashion line from stores and Uber's CEO to step down from Trump's advisory council, Mic previously reported. 

Boycotts work, Mic's Zak Cheney Rice noted. "The relative successes of the Uber boycott and #GrabYourWallet show there's power in collective action," Cheney Rice wrote on Feb. 3. "These people need to be shown that bigotry isn't lucrative. Dissenters must continue to make them pay."