Chaffetz won't investigate Flynn's Russia ties, but he’s going after Clinton’s emails

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah), chairman of the House Oversight Committee, said he won't investigate the details that led to Michael Flynn's resignation, saying the "situation has taken care of itself."

Chaffetz is, however, still pursuing the investigation into former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's emails, issuing a recommendation Thursday to Attorney General Jeff Sessions to prosecute a former Clinton staffer for contempt.

In the letter, Chaffetz asked Bryan Pagliano — a former Clinton technology aide who maintained Clinton's email server — for prosecution for "failing to appear pursuant to a subpoena" to a hearing on Clinton's emails last September. 

A House panel already voted to hold Pagliano in contempt last September, but he was never arrested or prosecuted.

Pagliano was deposed by Judicial Watch, a conservative group that's still pursuing the Clinton email case. He invoked his Fifth Amendment rights more than 125 times during the deposition, refusing to answer any questions, according to a Fox News report from the time. 

Chaffetz's refusal to investigate Flynn, as well as President Donald Trump's ties to Russia, has Democrats up in arms.

Instead of investigating Flynn's Russian ties, he is instead probing the intelligence leaks that led to Flynn's resignation.

And his decision to move forward on the Clinton email case is likely to exacerbate that anger.

Chaffetz, for his part, has said he would continue to investigate Clinton's use of a private email server, even though she lost the election.

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During Trump's inauguration, he posted an image of himself shaking hands with Clinton on Instagram with the caption, "The investigation continues."

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Emily C. Singer

Emily C. Singer, née Cahn, is a senior writer for Mic covering politics. She is based in New York and can be reached at esinger@mic.com

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