Pope Francis subtweeting Donald Trump is the best thing you'll see all week

Pope Francis subtweeting Donald Trump is the best thing you'll see all week
Source: AP
Source: AP

The Ten Commandments declare thou shalt not kill, thou shalt not commit adultery and thou shalt not not steal, but nowhere does it say "thou shalt not subtweet" — which means Pope Francis' recent shady tweets are totally above board.

Last week, the pontiff had some words for President Donald Trump, following Trump's January executive order issuing a temporary ban on refugees and suspending visas from seven majority-Muslim countries. The pope didn't mention Trump in his tweets, but his reminders that the Bible preaches acceptance for immigrants and foreigners were unmistakably inspired by recent events.

"The throwaway culture is not of Jesus," the pope wrote on Feb. 15. "The other is my brother, beyond every barrier of nationality, social extraction or religion."

And on Saturday the pope emphasized just "how often" the Bible mentions the importance of being welcoming to migrants.

These tweets led up to his sickest burn yet — a subtweet tackling Trump's U.S.-Mexico border wall

"Jesus entrusted to Peter the keys to open the entrance to the kingdom of heaven, and not to close it," the pontiff wrote.

The text of the Bible itself is pretty explicit in its attitudes toward immigrants and refugees: the Common English Bible translation of Deuteronomy 10:17-19 reads, "[God] enacts justice for orphans and widows, and he loves immigrants, giving them food and clothing. That means you must also love immigrants because you were immigrants in Egypt."

Later, God reminds, "Don't obstruct the legal rights of an immigrant or orphan." and goes on to emphasize, "Cursed is anyone who obstructs the legal rights of immigrants, orphans, or widows."

If God is indeed all-powerful and all-knowing, the Bible just may be the original subtweet. 

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Marie Solis

Marie is a staff writer with a focus in feminist issues. Her writing has appeared in Gothamist and the Awl. You can reach her at marie@mic.com.

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