Oscars 2017: Katherine Johnson, who inspired 'Hidden Figures,' receives standing ovation

Oscars 2017: Katherine Johnson, who inspired 'Hidden Figures,' receives standing ovation
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Before awarding the Oscar for best documentary feature to OJ: Made in America, Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer and Janelle Monáe brought the real figure behind Hidden Figures onto the Academy Awards stage on Sunday.

Katherine Johnson, the NASA mathematician who inspired the events in Hidden Figures, offered her thanks as the audience gave her a lengthy standing ovation.

The entire moment, as some people said on Twitter, was the epitome of #BlackGirlMagic.

Mic has ongoing Oscars coverage. Please follow our main Oscars hub here.

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Mathew Rodriguez

Mathew Rodriguez is a Staff Writer at Mic. He is a queer Latino New Yorker who enjoys female rappers, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Flannery O'Connor. He is a former editor at TheBody.com and he is working on a memoir.

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