A new campaign proves that not only is makeup OK for men, it's OK for anyone of any gender

Source: Milk Makeup/Very Good LIght

Men and makeup has been one of the hottest topics in the beauty world. In the past few months, some of the largest beauty brands in the world, from CoverGirl to Maybelline to L'Oreal to Rimmel, have stepped up and started to include men in their makeup campaigns, with some companies even naming them ambassadors. 

But now that more and more people are understanding that it's absolutely OK for men to embrace makeup, where can the conversation go from here? 

Well, according to a new campaign from Milk Makeup, the conversation can go to this: Anyone, regardless of how they identify or don't identify along the gender spectrum, is free to experiment with makeup, too. 

In a campaign released on Monday titled "Blur the Lines," Milk Makeup and men's beauty website Very Good Light teamed up to break open the gender conversation, introducing a slew of young people talking about not only gender and their own identities, but just how complex that can get. 

"Blur the Lines"
Source: 
Mic/YouTube

One by one, the models introduce themselves via how they identify.

Like Madeleine Vintback, who says, "I identify myself as a woman but most people would call me an alien. I mean, I'm a little weirdo." 

"Blur the Lines"
Source: 
Mic/YouTube

"In terms of gender I identify as he, man, him or queen," Marcelo Gutierrez says. 

"Blur the Lines"
Source: 
Mic /YouTube

"If we're putting a name on it, I feel more like a boy growing into a man. It's too complex to be put into a box," Eric Stone Carson says. 

"Blur the Lines"
Source: 
Mic/YouTube

"He and she are literally two and three letters, like very small words. And they only have so much power as you give them," Avie Acosta says. 

"Blur the Lines"
Source: 
Mic/YouTube

Other people included in the ad include Dagsen Love, Rayne Nadurata and Eddy LeRoy. The only common denominator among them is that they all love makeup and, more specifically, the smartly named "Blur Stick" this video was produced to advertise. 

"[Beauty is] years of placing people in rigid boxes that have created unfair gender roles for both women and men," Very Good Light founder David Yi told Yahoo. "I believe that beauty should be about self-expression, empowerment and finding your best light, no matter who you are. Genderless beauty, therefore, is all about being your authentic self. Using products that enhance who you are, and finding that inner confidence from the inside out." 

A photo posted by (@) on

Clearly here, the message is that no matter how any of these people identify — whether it be he/him or alien or queen — or how you identify, makeup is for everyone to use to express themselves however they like. 

You can watch the entire Milk Makeup campaign below: 

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Rachel Lubitz

Rachel is a senior Style writer at Mic. She previously worked for The Washington Post's Style section for more than three years. Feel free to contact her at rachel@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Charleena Lyles was a "powerful lady" — until she faced Seattle's flawed criminal justice system

Like Charleena Lyles, women who experience mental health instabilities have been more likely than men to encounter a criminal justice system that is ill-equipped to treat them.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.

Charleena Lyles was a "powerful lady" — until she faced Seattle's flawed criminal justice system

Like Charleena Lyles, women who experience mental health instabilities have been more likely than men to encounter a criminal justice system that is ill-equipped to treat them.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.