Grindr's "gaymoji" update lets users trade saucy, sexual emojis. Beware: They autosend.

Grindr's "gaymoji" update lets users trade saucy, sexual emojis. Beware: They autosend.
Source: Grindr
Source: Grindr

Need to tell a potential hookup you're into bondage and want to trade dirty pictures, but prefer to communicate solely via pictograph? We've all been there. Well, the (infamous?) gay hookup-slash-dating app Grindr now offers a host of emojis — called "gaymoji" — exclusive to the app that you can send to a potential suitor. 

Say what you will about Grindr, but it definitely went all-in with this particular update. There are 500 icons you can integrate to your messages, ranging from a bountiful variety of eggplants in all sorts of scenarios to an image of a stereotypical crazy cat lady.

Here's just a brief sampling of the options you have:

Ah, the wonders of modern romance.
Source: 
Grindr

The update has been out only for a short time, but Grindr has already had to pull one of its more controversial symbols — a single, golden "T" — because some users thought it was a reference to crystal meth. 

Grindr told Mic it was intended to be used in concert with the "D" icon to form the open-ended phrase "down to." Despite the removal of the potentially nefarious "T," there's still a gaymoji that depicts poppers, a recreational drug that's used to enhance sexual pleasure.

Regardless of your stance on the inclusion of those saucier icons, beware: If you choose to use any of them — even the wholesome ones — they'll autosend to your recipient as soon as you tap them. I found that out the hard way when I accidentally invited someone to have a kiki.

Oops
Source: 
Mic

Stay safe out there, folks.

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Tim Mulkerin

Tim Mulkerin writes about video games for Mic. You can reach him at tim@mic.com.

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