This chrome extension fakes your search history to troll the hell out of your ISP

This chrome extension fakes your search history to troll the hell out of your ISP
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

In a blow to consumer privacy, Congress voted to officially repeal Obama-era Federal Communications Commission guidelines that prevented internet service providers — such as AT&T, Verizon and Comcast — from collecting and selling your sensitive information to third parties without your consent. 

Assuming President Donald Trump will sign the bill, there are a handful of preventative measures you can take to protect your data, such as using a trustworthy virtual private network service (known as a VPN) or a Tor browser. 

Or you can just try and confuse the hell out of your ISP.

TrackMeNot Google Chrome extension
Source: 
Google Chrome

TrackMeNot is a Google Chrome extension that can muddle your web history by inundating the list with false data. It's not ideal — your history is still available and up for grabs — but it does aim to prevent advertisers from more accurately profiling, and ultimately targeting, you.

"TrackMeNot may not radically alter the privacy landscape but helps to place a particularly sensitive arena of contemporary life back in the hands of individuals, where it belongs in any free society," the creators wrote on the website. That's because it uses "noise and obfuscation," as they note, rather than encryption. 

Other developers are getting in on the fun. This morning, redditor FascinatedBox posted a GitHub project to /r/technology called RuinMyHistory. "Consider this a pre-emptive protest, in that it pollutes your search history to make it worthless," the user wrote on GitHub:

The page works by spawning a page that is redirected to a series of websites (currently: Alexa top 100, minus any ad-related sites). The page will rotate between different sites.

Though, the developer warns, "You shouldn't use this if you are running on a limited amount of bandwidth."

If you want to more comprehensively obfuscate your browsing data from ISPs, here are five ways to protect your internet privacy.

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Melanie Ehrenkranz

Melanie is a writer covering technology and the future. She can be reached at melanie@mic.com.

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