Donald Trump just told Michael Flynn to take immunity — after telling Clinton not to

Donald Trump just told Michael Flynn to take immunity — after telling Clinton not to
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Former national security adviser Michael Flynn — forced to resign in February for not fully disclosing details on his communications with the Russian government — made headlines Thursday by telling Congressional officials and the Federal Bureau of Investigation that he would testify in exchange for immunity. Specifically, he would be interviewed by officials investigating the administration's ties to Russia during the elections.

Early Friday morning, President Donald Trump used Twitter to endorse this move: "Mike Flynn should ask for immunity in that this is a witch hunt (excuse for big election loss), by media and Dems, of historic proportion!"

Trump's message starkly contradicts another of his tweets from October, in which he derided then-opponent Democrat Hillary Clinton after one of her top aides was granted limited immunity in exchange for her testimony in an FBI investigation into Clinton's private email server.

His insistence that the Russia probe is in part driven by Democrats who are embittered by a historic landslide loss in the elections is also at odds with the facts: Trump lost the popular vote to Clinton by around 3 million.

Flynn's testimony could potentially be a useful addition to those officials investigating whether the Trump team colluded with Russia to interfere in the presidential elections; Russian relations have plagued the White House with a multitude of controversies since Trump took office. 

The Senate Intelligence Committee continued its investigation Thursday, questioning three hacking experts during a hearing. Flynn may well follow suit. 

"Gen. Flynn certainly has a story to tell, and he very much wants to tell it," his lawyer said in a statement Thursday.

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Natasha Noman

Natasha is a News Staff Writer covering global affairs. She previously reported on regional affairs from Pakistan. Natasha is based in New York and can be reached at natasha@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Randy “Iron Stache” Bryce gets in on the New York City fundraiser game — of a different sort

Randy Bryce met with small dollar progressive donors at a New York dive bar to support his race against Paul Ryan.

Obamacare repeal and replace amendment fails in the Senate

Just six hours after advancing the health care bill to debate, Republicans saw a major setback.

John McCain implored colleagues to “return to regular order.” Senators aren’t sure they can do that.

"It's not an institution people can be proud of."

Senate Republicans advance Obamacare repeal effort to debate

Senate Republicans may have cleared their first hurdle, but many more remain.

Hundreds of disability rights activists vow an indefinite sit-in if the ACA is repealed

This isn't the first time ADAPT has protested the GOP's mission to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Motions to proceed and vote-a-ramas: Here’s how the health care process will play out

There are a lot of moving parts, and even if everything goes right for the GOP, a final vote won't happen until Wednesday.

Randy “Iron Stache” Bryce gets in on the New York City fundraiser game — of a different sort

Randy Bryce met with small dollar progressive donors at a New York dive bar to support his race against Paul Ryan.

Obamacare repeal and replace amendment fails in the Senate

Just six hours after advancing the health care bill to debate, Republicans saw a major setback.

John McCain implored colleagues to “return to regular order.” Senators aren’t sure they can do that.

"It's not an institution people can be proud of."

Senate Republicans advance Obamacare repeal effort to debate

Senate Republicans may have cleared their first hurdle, but many more remain.

Hundreds of disability rights activists vow an indefinite sit-in if the ACA is repealed

This isn't the first time ADAPT has protested the GOP's mission to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Motions to proceed and vote-a-ramas: Here’s how the health care process will play out

There are a lot of moving parts, and even if everything goes right for the GOP, a final vote won't happen until Wednesday.