After getting shamed on Instagram for her body hair, this teen expertly clapped back

After getting shamed on Instagram for her body hair, this teen expertly clapped back
Source: Twitter
Source: Twitter

If you scroll through 17-year-old college student and illustrator Lalonie Davis' Instagram account right now, you'll see a series of cute mirror selfies, makeup shots, pictures of Davis looking carefree while frolicking through gardens with flowers in her hair and status quo group shots with friends. 

When Davis posted a selfie proudly showing off her body hair last week on Instagram and Twitter, plenty of people had something to say. 

On Twitter, she posted a picture of her armpits and her stomach. "Body hair positivity post because I'd never let misogynistic opinions dictate what I do with my body," she wrote. 

On Instagram, she echoed that sentiment. 

"A body hair positivity post to remind you all that what I do with my body is MY choice," Davis wrote on Instagram. "You don't have to like it, but please know that misogynistic opinions that shame girls for having body hair while ignoring boys who do will never get me to change who I am." 

A photo posted by (@) on

"Baby girls don't ever let anyone ever make you feel bad for being who you are or doing what you want to do," Davis continued. "You are deserving of self-respect and love no matter the decisions you make with your body. Body hair is normal and so are you. It's okay to do what you want to do with your body. I love you guys." 

Innocent enough, yeah? Just a woman standing up for her right to do whatever she wants with her body hair — and body. 

Though apparently, it actually was offensive to some — but Davis isn't backing down. Later that day, Davis posted another picture on Instagram and Twitter, this time a collage of all the mean tweets that had gone out since she posted her selfie.

A photo posted by (@) on

"Y'all think body hair on girls is gross, I think misogyny is grosser," Davis wrote on Instagram. "Why can't I do what I want to do w MY body w/o being told to kill myself? Within one hour of posting a picture of my body hair on twitter, I received over 200 negative quotes tweets. I had to turn my notifications off be a use my phone kept freezing. This just goes to show so much about our culture, why do y'all hate carefree woman so much?" 

Days later, she reposted a video internet personality Prince Don had made that poked fun and judged women like Davis, even using Davis' picture. 

A photo posted by (@) on

"I AM SO FLATTERED THAT THIS BOY TOOK TIME OUT OF HIS DAY TO MAKE THIS WHOLE ASS VIDEO EDIT TO DEMEAN WOMEN!!!!" Davis exclaimed in the caption. "P.S. WHY IS THE INTERNET SO OBSESSED WITH IMAGINING WHAT MY VAGINA MIGHT LOOK LIKE?" 

Although it may feel like everyone is against Davis and her own right to wear her body hair as she pleases, there's also been an outpouring of support for her in light of this hate. 

"I think it's really sad that girls are taught from a young age that we need to maintain a certain image in order to be labelled as 'feminine' or even 'normal' in today's standards," one commenter wrote. "Real women have hair and real women aren't ashamed of it. Keep doin' you, there's always somebody out there who won't agree with your personal opinions or style." 

A photo posted by (@) on

"I mostly see girls with little blonde hairs saying they're not gonna shave anymore and gonna be themselves and whatever, which is awesome but I'm like, you can hardly see that sh*t anyway!" another wrote. "But finally I've seen someone with dark hair that is more prominent and I relate so much more to you having thick dark hair on your body."

Clearly, Davis has her supporters. In not wanting to shave all of her body hair, Davis joins women around the world who are talking about the choices they have when it comes to body hair, like Emma Watson, who recently revealed that she doesn't remove all of her pubic hair, and Adele, who literally said "I'll have no man telling me to shave my fuckin' legs. Shave yours." 

That's a pretty good motto to live by, isn't it? 

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Rachel Lubitz

Rachel is a senior Style writer at Mic. She previously worked for The Washington Post's Style section for more than three years. Feel free to contact her at rachel@mic.com.

MORE FROM

What Melania Trump wore her 26th week as first lady — when she only re-emerged twice to watch golf

It was pretty quiet on the Melania Trump front this week.

This artist is celebrating the beauty of stretch marks by painting them

"All bodies have stains, hairs, freckles, stretch marks, curves, lines, wounds, wrinkles... and all are equally valid."

Plus-size model Kelvin Davis on what it’s really like to shop as a plus-size man

"I don’t really know why companies are not making larger sizes.”

Dascha Polanco on inclusive fashion, her hashtag #selflovery and redefining beauty standards

We spoke to the 'Orange Is the New Black' actress about why she believes fashion should be for all sizes.

Every stunning look Michelle Obama’s rocked in her six months since leaving the White House

We've rounded up every single post-FLOTUS appearance.

Under Armour's latest campaign is celebrating the power of female athletes

Jessie Graff, Alison Désir, Natasha Hastings and Zoe Zhang also appear in the ads.

What Melania Trump wore her 26th week as first lady — when she only re-emerged twice to watch golf

It was pretty quiet on the Melania Trump front this week.

This artist is celebrating the beauty of stretch marks by painting them

"All bodies have stains, hairs, freckles, stretch marks, curves, lines, wounds, wrinkles... and all are equally valid."

Plus-size model Kelvin Davis on what it’s really like to shop as a plus-size man

"I don’t really know why companies are not making larger sizes.”

Dascha Polanco on inclusive fashion, her hashtag #selflovery and redefining beauty standards

We spoke to the 'Orange Is the New Black' actress about why she believes fashion should be for all sizes.

Every stunning look Michelle Obama’s rocked in her six months since leaving the White House

We've rounded up every single post-FLOTUS appearance.

Under Armour's latest campaign is celebrating the power of female athletes

Jessie Graff, Alison Désir, Natasha Hastings and Zoe Zhang also appear in the ads.