Gordon Ramsay compared Indian breakfast to prison food — and Twitter came for him

Source: Twitter
Source: Twitter

Yucking someone else's yum is poor form — but it's become something of chef Gordon Ramsay's brand. The celebrity chef recently roasted a polarizing, fruity pizza topping, but he hasn't stopped there. 

On Thursday, Ramsay got himself into some hot water after a Twitter user named Rameez asked Ramsay to "please rate my medu vada sambar and nariyal chutney."

Medu vada is a traditional South Indian breakfast food and snack made from small black beans. The metal dish is a thali, which can be a rectangular or circular platter. 

Ramsay's response to the dish? "I didn't know you could tweet from prison," he wrote. 

Ramsay is somewhat of an equal opportunity offender when it comes to insulting people's food. Still, his comment about the Indian dish rankled Twitter users who thought his criticism of Indian food was outrageous. 

But others defended Ramsay. 

As for Rameez, he seems pleased with Ramsay's Twitter burn. 

"I was expecting it. Anyone who has spent enough time on the internet knows what they're in for when they send him a food picture. I wanted a hilarious response and I got it," he told DNA India. He also tweeted "mission accomplished" on April 6. 

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Alex Orlov

Alex is a food staff writer. She can be reached at aorlov@mic.com.

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