Alleged North Korea Evacuations: Is Kim Jong Un really ordering immediate evacuations in Pyongyang?

Alleged North Korea Evacuations: Is Kim Jong Un really ordering immediate evacuations in Pyongyang?
North Korean soldiers walk in the Ryomyong residential area. Wong Maye-E/AP
North Korean soldiers walk in the Ryomyong residential area. Wong Maye-E/AP

Breathless reports of a major evacuation in Pyongyang — based on a single report from Russian outlet Pravda Report — claim that 600,000 people are being sent out of North Korea's capitol city amid rising tensions with the U.S.

The only source for this extraordinary claim is New York City-based radio station SuperStation95. Here's the unsourced claim from the website's article, which has no specific author and credits the story to "Newsroom":

The leader of North Korea has ordered almost 25% of the population of its capital city, Pyongyang, to LEAVE! That's 600,000 people!

While the government claims this is a "population control" measure, it comes as tensions with the United States — and possibility of a hot war — escalate.

At this time, Mic cannot corroborate a single one of these claims. 

We've reached out to SuperStation95 via the contact information provided in the story but have yet to receive a response.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, right, is followed by military and government officials as he arrives for the official opening of the Ryomyong residential area.
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, right, is followed by military and government officials as he arrives for the official opening of the Ryomyong residential area. Wong Maye-E/AP

The actual "big and important event" was reportedly a road opening

Journalists gathered for a much-hyped "big and important event" that was speculated to relate to North Korea's international tensions were treated to a significantly less exciting reveal.

The Financial Times reported the following:

With tensions on the Korean peninsula escalated and satellites showing activity around North Korea’s primary nuclear test site, expectations were correspondingly high when journalists in Pyongyang were summoned for a big event on Thursday. 

Accounts from those who were in attendance now suggest a somewhat less enormous development: the opening of a new street.

Yes, it's possible that all the widespread speculation of evacuations and precursors to war following a "big and important event" may have been a giant misunderstanding about a road opening.

While there are plenty of legitimate concerns about North Korea's recent actions and possible U.S. responses, this road isn't among them.