Sonny Perdue becomes second to last member of Trump's Cabinet to be confirmed

Source: AP
Source: AP

Former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue has become the second to last member of President Donald Trump's Cabinet to be confirmed, with the Senate approving his nomination for secretary of agriculture 87-11 on bipartisan lines on Monday.

As ABC News noted, Perdue is the first Southerner in more than 20 years to hold the post, and has promised to advocate for rural communities amid Trump's plan to cut billions of dollars from the Department of Agriculture's discretionary budget. Though he is not affiliated with the several food companies using the Perdue name, his nomination was nonetheless slowed as the White House prepared the ethics agreement required of senior administration appointees with possible conflicts of interest — a process which slowed his confirmation to just short of the conclusion of the first 100 days of Trump's presidency.

While governor of Georgia, Perdue had some similarities to the ethics concerns now dogging Trump — including promises to crack down on alleged corruption in the state capital of Atlanta which were belied by his refusal to step down from ownership or managerial roles in four farming businesses. According to the New York Times, the State Ethics Commission had lodged 13 separate ethics complaints against Perdue by the end of his run as governor, twice ruling he had broken the law. Controversies included a state legislator who was also Perdue's attorney proposing a bill which granted the governor a $100,000 state tax cut, as well as meeting with Georgia officials to discuss starting an export business before leaving office.

The last remaining cabinet-level role in Trump's administration, secretary of labor, has yet to be filled. Trump has nominated Florida International University College of Law dean Alexander Acosta, with Republicans planning to put him up to a confirmation vote as soon as this week.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Tom McKay

Tom is a staff writer at Mic, covering national politics, media, policing and the war on drugs. He is based in New York and can be reached at tmckay@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Senate Republicans' Obamacare repeal bill may be flatlining

Republican leadership is scrambling to convert skeptical senators to let the bill move forward to a final vote.

One of Trump's warmest meetings with a world leader yet was Narendra Modi, an accused fascist

Modi hugged Trump during a White House visit on Monday — a far cry from 2002, when he was accused of massacring Muslims in Gujarat.

Donald Trump is hurting America's image around the world, new study finds

The leader of the free world apparently has image problems at home AND abroad.

Even Donald Trump's schedule has become a victim of a White House push against transparency

"Unreportable" public schedules, off camera briefings, secret visitor logs ... Where does it end?

The CBO score says 22 million will lose coverage. Here's why it's actually a lot worse than that.

Republicans wrote the bill so that much of the coverage losses wouldn't be captured by the CBO report.

CBO Score: Senate Republican health care bill will cost 22 million people their coverage

That's 1 million fewer than under the House-passed health care bill.

Senate Republicans' Obamacare repeal bill may be flatlining

Republican leadership is scrambling to convert skeptical senators to let the bill move forward to a final vote.

One of Trump's warmest meetings with a world leader yet was Narendra Modi, an accused fascist

Modi hugged Trump during a White House visit on Monday — a far cry from 2002, when he was accused of massacring Muslims in Gujarat.

Donald Trump is hurting America's image around the world, new study finds

The leader of the free world apparently has image problems at home AND abroad.

Even Donald Trump's schedule has become a victim of a White House push against transparency

"Unreportable" public schedules, off camera briefings, secret visitor logs ... Where does it end?

The CBO score says 22 million will lose coverage. Here's why it's actually a lot worse than that.

Republicans wrote the bill so that much of the coverage losses wouldn't be captured by the CBO report.

CBO Score: Senate Republican health care bill will cost 22 million people their coverage

That's 1 million fewer than under the House-passed health care bill.