The abortion loophole in the GOP's health plan that would screw over blue-state residents

Source: AP
Source: AP

It's no secret that the GOP's health care plan would be a disaster for women's health and reproductive choices.

But on Thursday, Rep. Dan Donovan (R-NY) managed to stun even MSNBC host Chris Hayes with news of how the legislation would conflict with blue states' own policies on abortion coverage.

According to Donovan, the tax credits the GOP's plan offers to reduce astronomical insurance costs wouldn't be available to anyone who lives in states that require insurance companies to cover abortion services. Why? Because it's illegal to use tax credits to support abortion.

"The help we were going to give those hardworking people who don't get their insurance from their employer or don't qualify for government assistance, who have to buy insurance themselves, we weren't providing them the relief they deserve," Donovan said. 

"The tax credits are unusable," he continued.

Hayes, whose jaw dropped upon this revelation, implored Donovan, "How is any Republican in California or New York going to vote for this thing?"

"I don't know. I can only count for myself, Chris," Donovan replied.

Yes, you heard it right — President Donald Trump's administration might be risking another failed attempt to pass this health care legislation all because Republicans are bent on limiting women's reproductive freedoms at the expense of their own constituents.

As for Donovan, the representative told NPR in March that he planned to vote against the legislation, saying, "This bill just doesn't help the people in my district that need help."

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Marie Solis

Marie is a Slay staff writer with focuses in culture and class. Her writing has appeared in Gothamist and the Awl. You can reach her at marie@mic.com.

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