George Will: Trump is "uniquely unfit" to be president

AP

George Will — the Pulitzer Prize-winning conservative commentator — took Donald Trump to task in a scathing column in the Washington Post on Wednesday, slamming the president for his "untrained mind bereft of information."

"It is urgent for Americans to think and speak clearly about President Trump's inability to do either," Will wrote. "This seems to be not a mere disinclination but a disability."

Will was responding to Trump's bizarre, ahistorical suggestion that Andrew Jackson could have prevented the American Civil War and his questioning of why the war was necessary.

"People don't ask that question, but why was there the Civil War?" Trump asked in an interview with the Washington Examiner. "Why could that one not have been worked out?"

It was Trump's latest in a long line of gaffes that revealed his ignorance, and Will wasn't having any of it. Trump has "entered his eighth decade unscathed by even elementary knowledge about the nation's history," Will wrote, and is dangerous on the world stage.

"The problem isn't that he does not know this or that, or that he does not know that he does not know this or that," Will wrote. "Rather, the dangerous thing is that he does not know what it is to know something."

President Donald Trump "does not know what it is to know something," conservative columnist George Will wrote Wednesday.Source: Susan Walsh/AP
President Donald Trump "does not know what it is to know something," conservative columnist George Will wrote Wednesday.  Susan Walsh/AP

"His fathomless lack of interest in America's path to the present and his limitless gullibility leave him susceptible to being blown about by gusts of factoids that cling like lint to a disorderly mind," Will continued.

While Trump's so-called "intellectual sloth" is not news to many, the argument seemed especially potent coming from the conservative icon.

But, according to Will, everyone must help "quarantine" Trump's presidency.

"It is up to the public to quarantine this presidency by insistently communicating to its elected representatives a steady, rational fear of this man whose combination of impulsivity and credulity render him uniquely unfit to take the nation into a military conflict," Will concluded.