Democrats' trust in the government just hit a historic low

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

It's been a rough few months for Democrats in America. Not only did their party lose the presidential election, but they also had to watch President Donald Trump decimate some of President Barack Obama's legacy legislation. And to add insult to injury, House Republicans managed to pass a bill aimed at replacing the Affordable Care Act on Thursday.

So it's no real surprise that a new Pew Research poll found that just 15% of Democrats trust the government in Washington to do the right thing always or most of the time.

"The share of Democrats expressing trust in government is among the lowest levels for members of the party dating back nearly six decades," Pew said in a post on its site that announced the findings.

The national survey was conducted April 5 to 11 and included 1,501 adults. In total, the overall level of trust in government, Pew said, remains at near historic lows. "Just 20% say they trust the government to do what's right always or most of the time. Far more say they trust the government only some of the time (68%); 11% volunteer that they never trust the government to do what's right."

This poll marked the first time since George W. Bush's presidency that Republicans were more likely to say they trust the government in Washington than Democrats, with 28% of Republicans saying they trust the government at least most of the time.

Beyond trust, the poll also showed that U.S. citizens are incredibly frustrated with the government. "A majority of Americans say frustration (55%) best describes their feeling toward the federal government, while about two in 10 say they are angry (22%); a similar share (19%) say they are basically content," Pew reported. This frustration is really nothing new, though — poll numbers in March 2016 presented nearly identical results.

As Pew's poll showed, there is one thing people on both sides of the political aisle can agree on: the future.

According to Pew, 41% of respondents said they have quite a lot of confidence in the future of the country, while 30% said they have some confidence. Sure, nearly one-third of the respondents said they have no confidence in our future, but we'll choose to see the glass half full with the other 71%.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Stacey Leasca

Stacey Leasca is a news writer with Mic. Her byline has appeared in Travel+Leisure, the Los Angeles Times, GOOD Magazine and more. When not writing you can find her surfing in Southern California.

MORE FROM

Senate Health Care Bill: How senators plan to vote on the GOP health care plan

The Senate health care bill is in peril, as at least five Republicans have said they can't vote for it in its current form.

Supreme Court allows parts of Trump's travel ban to go into effect, will hear arguments in fall

"We leave the injunctions entered by the lower courts in place with respect to respondents [who have a] bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States."

Moderate Republicans say they won't cut health insurance. But all the GOP proposals do just that.

Senators like Susan Collins (R-Maine) have said they won't support cuts to existing health insurance coverage. That's all the GOP has put forward.

Kellyanne Conway defends Medicaid cuts, says "able-bodied" adults need only find jobs

Finding a job with health care benefits may not be as easy as Conway suggests.

Bernie Sanders makes bipartisan appeal to delay vote on Senate health care bill

A call to postpone the vote on the Senate's health care bill till after the July 4 holiday recess has bipartisan support.

Senate Health Care Bill: How senators plan to vote on the GOP health care plan

The Senate health care bill is in peril, as at least five Republicans have said they can't vote for it in its current form.

Supreme Court allows parts of Trump's travel ban to go into effect, will hear arguments in fall

"We leave the injunctions entered by the lower courts in place with respect to respondents [who have a] bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States."

Moderate Republicans say they won't cut health insurance. But all the GOP proposals do just that.

Senators like Susan Collins (R-Maine) have said they won't support cuts to existing health insurance coverage. That's all the GOP has put forward.

Kellyanne Conway defends Medicaid cuts, says "able-bodied" adults need only find jobs

Finding a job with health care benefits may not be as easy as Conway suggests.

Bernie Sanders makes bipartisan appeal to delay vote on Senate health care bill

A call to postpone the vote on the Senate's health care bill till after the July 4 holiday recess has bipartisan support.