Now you can mail your ashes to Republican lawmakers who voted away your health insurance

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Want to mail your own ashes in an envelope to the Republican lawmakers that killed you by voting to take away your health insurance? Wish no more!

After the House GOP pushed the American Health Care Act through a vote Thursday — a bill that, according to the most recent estimates by the Congressional Budget Office, is likely to increase the number of uninsured Americans by 24 million — enterprising internet user Zoey Jordan Salsbury created a website to help people who believe they'll lose coverage cope.

Salsbury's website, Mail Me to the GOP, promises to mail your remains to the Republican lawmakers who ostensibly put you in the ground for voting for a bill that would allow states to let insurers hike up premiums for people with pre-existing conditions — which, as Time notes, could include things like diabetes, obesity and even pregnancy.

"Millions of Americans rely on protections and coverage from the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare. The [Republicans'] new bill will gut these protections and many will die," the site's description proclaims. "They deserve to know it. Fill out our form and we'll help you get papers in order to send your ashes to a GOP member of Congress if you pass."

A screenshot of Mail Me to the GOP.
Source: 
http://mailmetothegop.com/

Perhaps more pragmatically, the site also offers users information on how to contact their senators to urge them to vote the bill down, and how to unseat the representatives that passed the bill through the house.

It also features a testimonials page, called "Reasons Why We Will Die," where users can commiserate over the health concerns that will likely send them to an early grave without health coverage.

"I will die because I'm a Type 2 diabetic. I will die because I'm a volunteer fireman and probably going to get cancer at some point. I will die because I went to the World Trade Center and didn't have a respirator," one anonymous user wrote. 

"I am now going to get my next insurance denied because of this. These are all pre-existing conditions."

Correction: May 8, 2017
A previous version of this article misstated the name of the health care legislation voted through the house on Thursday. That bill is the American Health Care Act. This article also previously misstated the significance of the vote on the AHCA. That vote passed the legislation through the House of Representatives, sending it next to the Senate.

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Brianna Provenzano

Brianna is a staff writer at Mic, covering breaking news. Send tips/inquiries to brianna@mic.com.

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