Loveflutter app claims to know your personality type by analyzing your tweets

Source: AP
Source: AP

What's in a tweet? According to a new app, your true personality is in those 140 characters. 

The app, Analyze140, began to go viral on Wednesday, with many Twitter users sharing the results of the app's analysis of their tweets.

Type President Donald Trump's Twitter handle in, and you'll find the app rates Trump as "well-adjusted" and "power driven," results that may or may not be surprising to some.

Trump has a Type A personality, according to Analyze140.
Source: 
Analyze140

Analyze140 is a recent update added to Loveflutter, a U.K.-based online dating startup, which includes the ability to integrate Twitter feeds into dating profiles.

Along with the update, Loveflutter teamed up with Receptiviti to create a new tool called Analyze140, which takes any Twitter feed, quickly analyzes it and generates high-level insights about the Twitter user's character and emotions. 

"Receptiviti have amassed years of research into language analysis, stemming from Professor James Pennebaker's research into word use, language and personality," Daigo Smith, cofounder of Loveflutter, said via email. 

According to Smith, Pennebaker's work had shown frequency of certain words in tweets, such as the use of pronouns, can reveal a person's emotional, social and thinking style, making each tweet "like a fingerprint." 

Although the analysis tool and dating app are separate entities for now, Smith said that Loveflutter will soon harness Receptiviti's Language Style Matching technology to give users a compatibility score when viewing other profiles. 

Additionally, the app will eventually follow users' conversations once they match to analyze their chat and give an ongoing compatibility score. "We'll even be able to suggest when the best time to stop chatting and get on a date is," Smith said. However, Smith noted, the scores should only be used as a way to discover like-minded people and that the best way to get to know someone isn't by the numbers, but rather by meeting in real life.

Still, the Analyze140 is addictively fun, and seemingly rather accurate. Take for example, me, a 32-year-old writer living in Los Angeles who is apparently very neurotic and independent, somewhat impulsive and open to new things. 


I'm neurotic, according to the app's analysis.
Source: 
Analyze140

Oh, and according to the analysis (and all of my friends) I'm also incredibly socially inept, so don't bother inviting me to anything as I'll just sulk in the corner. 

Source: Analyze140

But you know what, I'm OK with that because it turns out, I'm a lot like Katy Perry, the most followed person on Twitter. 

According to her results, Perry's tweets convey that she too has a type A personality and gets annoyed if you speak too slowly to her. As her results additionally show, all that feuding with Taylor Swift might be a result of her being prone to negative emotions.

So, who would Loveflutter pair Perry with on a date? According to the app's findings, the singer would be a perfect match for one of Twitter's most prolific users, none other than Trump.

Katy Perry and Donald Trump are a good match, according to the app's algorithm.
Source: 
Analyze140

I asked Smith if I should be concerned that Trump appears to be far more well-adjusted than me and he kindly replied, "Well if you're anti-social, I'd suggest a takeaway at home, rather than 'date-night with Donald' at Trump Grill. It's just one marker of his personality, he's also power-driven and Type A, maybe they appeal to you?" 

Meanwhile, Barack Obama, the third most followed person on Twitter, is both well-adjusted and has superior social skills, according to his results. However, even his analysis proves that we all have a dark side. According to his report, Obama is also a power-hungry, domineering, workaholic like the rest of us.

According to the app, former President Obama is a workaholic.
Source: 
Analyze140

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Stacey Leasca

Stacey Leasca is a news writer with Mic. Her byline has appeared in Travel+Leisure, the Los Angeles Times, GOOD Magazine and more. When not writing you can find her surfing in Southern California.

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