How to find out which advertisers are targeting you on Twitter

How to find out which advertisers are targeting you on Twitter
The Twitter logo appears on an updated phone post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.
Source: Richard Drew/AP
The Twitter logo appears on an updated phone post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.
Source: Richard Drew/AP

Twitter is trying to be more transparent about how your profile is shown to potential advertisers. On Wednesday, it announced an update to its privacy policy, which includes Your Twitter Data, which allows users to view and modify information about them that advertisers can see. This encompasses users' age, gender, language, what devices they use to access Twitter, places they've been and a number of other bits of information companies will gobble up to spit out what they think is the most enticing way to get you to buy what they're selling. Or maybe just to give 'em that sweet RT.

Along with being able to view or modify that data, users can request a list of advertisers that have targeted them. You just have to click the "Request advertiser list" button under the Your Twitter Data settings, and almost instantly you will receive a PDF of the Twitter handles of companies that dangled their sweet promotions in your feed. Mine was 69 pages of Twitter handles, including @randpaul, @realdonaldtrump, @hillaryclinton, @airbnb, @comcast and @twitter.  

Tweaking the data advertisers are able to see will have a direct impact on the types of ads you'll find in your feed, but as Twitter notes in Settings, "it won't remove you from advertisers' audiences." Simply put, while you can try and manage the thousands of advertisers looking to lure you in (according to my profile, I'm a part of 19,831 audiences from 4,019 advertisers), you can't hide from them.

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Melanie Ehrenkranz

Melanie is a writer covering technology and the future. She can be reached at melanie@mic.com.

MORE FROM

There’s now a cochlear implant processor made to work with your iPhone

It's allegedly the first in the world of its kind.

Scientists edited mice brains so that they live longer — and humans could be next

Scientists managed to extend mouse life spans by up to 15%.

You’ll be able to watch the solar eclipse from ridiculous heights, thanks to these balloons

Watch the eclipse live, anywhere, as if you're in space.

Scientists say you should play video games on your breaks at work

Somebody file an expense report for an Xbox, pronto.

Apparently scientists didn’t know why rain drizzle happened — until now

Save this science for a rainy day.

There’s now a cochlear implant processor made to work with your iPhone

It's allegedly the first in the world of its kind.

Scientists edited mice brains so that they live longer — and humans could be next

Scientists managed to extend mouse life spans by up to 15%.

You’ll be able to watch the solar eclipse from ridiculous heights, thanks to these balloons

Watch the eclipse live, anywhere, as if you're in space.

Scientists say you should play video games on your breaks at work

Somebody file an expense report for an Xbox, pronto.

Apparently scientists didn’t know why rain drizzle happened — until now

Save this science for a rainy day.