LinkedIn's photo filters were way better than we thought they would be

LinkedIn photo filters
LinkedIn photo filters
opinion
Mic invites contributors and staff to offer commentary and context about news and timely issues.

When I logged onto the LinkedIn app on Wednesday, I was prompted to "boost your professional image in seconds with our new photo filters" — and what followed was an introductory video showing off how the professional social network can whitewash the hell out of you.

The before photo
Source: Melanie Ehrenkranz/LinkedIn
The after photo
Source: Melanie Ehrenkranz/LinkedIn
The before photo
Source: Melanie Ehrenkranz/LinkedIn
The after photo
Source: Melanie Ehrenkranz/LinkedIn

It's not the first time a social media company has tried to lighten the skin of its users as a standard of beauty — Snapchat has, on numerous occasions, and so did Tonr and FaceApp. I asked my colleague Xavier Harding to test out the feature to find out how intense the whitewashing was in execution. 

But we were both pleasantly surprised. Xavier toggled from filter to filter.

"Damn, I look good," he said.

The before photo
Source: Xavier Harding/LinkedIn
With a filter
Source: Xavier Harding/LinkedIn
With a filter
Source: Xavier Harding/LinkedIn
With a filter
Source: Xavier Harding/LinkedIn

While the tutorial video on the LinkedIn app screamed of yet another tech company rolling out a racist feature about to be dragged, in execution, the filters didn't whitewash —  they make you look amazing. I'd even go as far as to say the filters are better than the options afforded by the likes of Instagram and Snapchat. Maybe, could it be, they are more professional? 

While you can't save the filtered photo directly from the app (screenshot and crop, baby!), the options outshine the likes of the Valencia and Crema filters of Instagram. LinkedIn, the social network for professionals, may have finally figured out how to be relevant — by fueling our narcissism. But a word of advice for LinkedIn: You may want to edit your ignorant tutorial video. 

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Melanie Ehrenkranz

Melanie is a writer covering technology and the future. She can be reached at melanie@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Meet the Girl Scouts that will earn badges for being cybersecurity experts

They'll soon get badges for coding, cryptography and more.

How to use the Snapchat Map while everyone else continues to be confused about it

Everything you need to know about the new feature.

Planet 10? Scientists may have discovered a hidden planet in our solar system

There could be a ninth — or even 10th — planet hiding out in our solar system.

Scientists created a robot that will iron your clothes for you

Shut up and take my money.

Moth eyes have inspired the touchscreen of the future

It's going to change the anti-reflection game.

Twitter was flagging tweets including the word "queer" as potentially "offensive content"

Why Twitter put the word "queer" in the same category as violent, sexual imagery.

Meet the Girl Scouts that will earn badges for being cybersecurity experts

They'll soon get badges for coding, cryptography and more.

How to use the Snapchat Map while everyone else continues to be confused about it

Everything you need to know about the new feature.

Planet 10? Scientists may have discovered a hidden planet in our solar system

There could be a ninth — or even 10th — planet hiding out in our solar system.

Scientists created a robot that will iron your clothes for you

Shut up and take my money.

Moth eyes have inspired the touchscreen of the future

It's going to change the anti-reflection game.

Twitter was flagging tweets including the word "queer" as potentially "offensive content"

Why Twitter put the word "queer" in the same category as violent, sexual imagery.