This couple's bathing suit photo is sparking a conversation about weight, health and self-love

This couple's bathing suit photo is sparking a conversation about weight, health and self-love
Source: Instagram
Source: Instagram

With a seemingly simple beach photo on Instagram, body-positive advocate and aspiring plus-size model Jazzy, who goes by @a_body_positive_jazzy on Instagram, has ignited a conversation online about the importance of not only self-love, but the correlation between health, weight and worth in today's world.

It all started over the weekend, when Jazzy posted this picture of herself and her extremely buff husband at the beach:

A photo posted by (@) on

"Over the years, this man has loved every curve, every roll and every stretch mark on my body," Jazzy wrote. "I never understood why!"

She never understood, that is, until she learned that weight and size are not in direct correlation with worth and being worthy of love.

"How could a man who was 'born fit' love someone like me," Jazzy continued. "I don't have a flat stomach, I jiggle when I walk. Hell, if I run up the stairs too fast, my body claps... But now I see I do have the 'perfect' body!! Every roll, every curve and every stretch mark is put on me just perfect to make both of us happy!!! I love my body and I finally see why he does too!!"

A photo posted by (@) on

For many people on Instagram following Jazzy, this was something they needed to hear. "This helps me love my body more!" one commenter wrote.

But of course, Jazzy has also been plagued by trolls, who remain unmoved and continue to think that weight is connected with health.

One day after her original post, Jazzy posted another photo of a rather vitriolic comment. "Because you're fat doesn't mean you have to promote being physically unfit," it began, only going downhill from there.

A photo posted by (@) on

In response, Jazzy issued a declaration on self-love, and why it is so vital in today's culture to practice it.

"People like this hate on others because they are not happy with themselves," she wrote. "... Just because I'm a big girl doesn't mean I'm unhealthy and promoting being unhealthy! I'm simply promoting loving yourself the way you are! Never did I say unhealthy is the way to be. So for others that want to downplay me as a person and what I am trying to accomplish, go ahead leave your negative comment! They will only be used as fuel to my fire of promoting happiness!!"

So there.

Mic has reached out to Jazzy for further comment.

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Rachel Lubitz

Rachel is a senior Style writer at Mic. She previously worked for The Washington Post's Style section for more than three years. Feel free to contact her at rachel@mic.com.

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