Donald Trump's approval falls to new low

Source: Jacquelyn Martin/AP

President Donald Trump's approval rating fell to a new low on Wednesday, after Quinnipiac University released a poll finding just 34% of voters approve of the job he's doing.

That 34% approval rating is down three points from Quinnipiac's May 24 poll, and is the lowest Quinnipiac has recorded since Trump took office on Jan. 20.

Even more, the number of voters who "strongly approve" of Trump also fell to 25%, compared to the 51% of voters who "strongly disapprove" of the job he's doing in office.

The strong numbers represent an "enthusiasm gap." That means voters who disapprove of Trump are more likely to be passionate about that disapproval, while voters who approve of Trump are not as likely to be passionate about that approval.

Trump's approval rating slide comes as he faces a host of bad news regarding the FBI investigation into his campaign's alleged ties to Russia, as well as his decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate agreement — which 62% of voters disapprove of, according to the Quinnipiac poll.

"There is zero good news for President Donald Trump in this survey, just a continual slide into a chasm of doubt about his policies and his very fitness to serve," Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University poll, said in a news release.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Emily C. Singer

Emily C. Singer, née Cahn, is a senior writer for Mic covering politics. She is based in New York and can be reached at esinger@mic.com

MORE FROM

Ivanka Trump, first daughter and adviser to the president: "I try to stay out of politics"

"I don’t profess to be a political savant."

Senate Health Care Bill: How senators plan to vote on the GOP health care plan

The Senate health care bill is in peril, as at least five Republicans have said they can't vote for it in its current form.

Supreme Court allows parts of Trump's travel ban to go into effect, will hear arguments in fall

"We leave the injunctions entered by the lower courts in place with respect to respondents [who have a] bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States."

Moderate Republicans say they won't cut health insurance. But all the GOP proposals do just that.

Senators like Susan Collins (R-Maine) have said they won't support cuts to existing health insurance coverage. That's all the GOP has put forward.

Kellyanne Conway defends Medicaid cuts, says "able-bodied" adults need only find jobs

Finding a job with health care benefits may not be as easy as Conway suggests.

Ivanka Trump, first daughter and adviser to the president: "I try to stay out of politics"

"I don’t profess to be a political savant."

Senate Health Care Bill: How senators plan to vote on the GOP health care plan

The Senate health care bill is in peril, as at least five Republicans have said they can't vote for it in its current form.

Supreme Court allows parts of Trump's travel ban to go into effect, will hear arguments in fall

"We leave the injunctions entered by the lower courts in place with respect to respondents [who have a] bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States."

Moderate Republicans say they won't cut health insurance. But all the GOP proposals do just that.

Senators like Susan Collins (R-Maine) have said they won't support cuts to existing health insurance coverage. That's all the GOP has put forward.

Kellyanne Conway defends Medicaid cuts, says "able-bodied" adults need only find jobs

Finding a job with health care benefits may not be as easy as Conway suggests.