Video shows Jersey City police kicking injured bystander after fiery car crash

Source: NJ.com/YouTube

New cellphone footage made public Wednesday shows the brutal aftermath of a fiery car crash that happened in Jersey City, New Jersey, Sunday night.

In the video — which was first obtained by Univision — a crash victim can be seen pulling himself from the wreckage, flames still engulfing parts of his body. Police officers suddenly converge on the injured man, and at least one officer kicks him in the head while he's lying on the ground.

More officers appear to join in, dragging the victim into the road and kicking him repeatedly. The collision marked the end of a police pursuit that had begun earlier that evening, according to NJ.com. A spokesperson for the city, Jennifer Morrill, said she was concerned by how the officers handled the chase.

"We have serious concerns about the conduct of this pursuit; however, we are reserving judgment until the conclusion of the prosecutor's investigation," she told NJ.com.

Source: YouTube

It remains unclear why officers attacked the injured man to begin with, but reports state that the victim being kicked in the video is not, in fact, the man police had been chasing.

The real target of the pursuit was Leo Pinkston, 48, who was charged with eluding and aggravated assault after the chase ended. Pinkston was reportedly fleeing a traffic stop, and ended up crashing into the car that was being driven by the man in the video.

The victim in the video — who has not been named publicly, but is reportedly 28 years old — is "fighting for his life" in the hospital, with several broken bones, second- and third-degree burns and swelling on his face.

No police have been suspended in connection with the case, NJ.com reports. The Hudson County Prosecutor's officer has opened an investigation into the incident.


How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Zak Cheney Rice

Zak is a Senior Staff Writer at Mic.

MORE FROM

Burned Quran stuffed with bacon found outside California mosque

This isn't the first time bacon has been used as an act of provocation against Muslims.

Charleena Lyles was a "powerful lady" — until she faced Seattle's flawed criminal justice system

Like Charleena Lyles, women who experience mental health instabilities have been more likely than men to encounter a criminal justice system that is ill-equipped to treat them.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

Burned Quran stuffed with bacon found outside California mosque

This isn't the first time bacon has been used as an act of provocation against Muslims.

Charleena Lyles was a "powerful lady" — until she faced Seattle's flawed criminal justice system

Like Charleena Lyles, women who experience mental health instabilities have been more likely than men to encounter a criminal justice system that is ill-equipped to treat them.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.