Hillary Clinton says Republicans will be the "death party" if they pass health care bill

Hillary Clinton says Republicans will be the "death party" if they pass health care bill
Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks at the 2017 Stephan Weiss Apple Awards in New York City on June 7.
Source: Monica Schipper/Getty Images
Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks at the 2017 Stephan Weiss Apple Awards in New York City on June 7.
Source: Monica Schipper/Getty Images

On Friday, Hillary Clinton shared her feelings toward the Republican’s proposed replacement for the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare.

In a tweet, the former secretary of state wrote, "Forget death panels. If Republicans pass this bill, they're the death party."

In the same tweet, Clinton linked to a story by the Center for American Progress, an independent nonpartisan policy institute. The story examined the claim that more Americans will die on the Republican health care plan than the one that is currently in place.

"Assuming that 15 million fewer people would have coverage in 2026, we estimate that the coverage losses from the Senate bill would result in 18,100 additional deaths in 2026," the Center for American Progress explained, assuming coverage loss based on the previous Congressional Budget Office score. The report went on:

Assuming that 23 million fewer people would have coverage, we estimate that the coverage losses from the Senate bill would result in 27,700 additional deaths in 2026. If coverage losses from the Senate bill matched those from the House bill, it would result in 217,000 additional deaths over the next decade.

Clinton isn't the only former politician to voice major concerns over the bill. On Thursday, former President Barack Obama came out to defend his signature legislation, Mic reported.

"The Senate bill, unveiled today, is not a health care bill," Obama wrote in a Facebook post. "It's a massive transfer of wealth from middle-class and poor families to the richest people in America. It hands enormous tax cuts to the rich and to the drug and insurance industries, paid for by cutting health care for everybody else."