New CBO report says Senate health care bill would cut Medicaid by more than a third by 2036

New CBO report says Senate health care bill would cut Medicaid by more than a third by 2036
U.S. Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and Senate Majority Whip Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) emerge from the West Wing to speak to reporters about the health care bill.
Source: Alex Wong/Getty Images
U.S. Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and Senate Majority Whip Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) emerge from the West Wing to speak to reporters about the health care bill.
Source: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Congressional Budget Office has weighed in on the Senate health care bill once again — this time to say it gets worse.

The first time the CBO evaluated the bill they determined that, were it to become law, 22 million people would lose their health insurance over the next decade, much of that through cuts to the Medicaid program. Now a new report says that the bill would cut projected Medicaid spending by more than a third (35%) over the next two decades.

Medicaid is the nation’s single largest insurer and is relied upon by low-income Americans and the disabled who cannot get care elsewhere. Mic previously reported that the Senate bill’s effect on Medicaid coverage would be even greater beyond 2026 because of the way Senate Republicans back-ended their cuts to the program.

Though the new CBO report does not offer an estimate of how many more people would lose coverage as a result of these cuts, it’s safe to say it would affect even more than the 22 million people who were projected to lose coverage in the first report.

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Andrew Joyce

I cover politics and policy.

MORE FROM

3 key takeaways ahead of Jared Kushner’s questioning by Senate Intelligence Committee

Three key takeaways on Kushner's meeting with the Senate Intelligence Committee.

White House comms director Anthony Scaramucci says he’ll start firing people “if leaks don’t stop”

Scaramucci says he will take "dramatic action to stop those leaks."

CNN’s Jake Tapper and Anthony Scaramucci trade barbs in heated interview

The heated interview with the new White House communications director took place Sunday on CNN's 'State of the Union with Jake Tapper.'

The Democrats’ new slogan shows they learned nothing from Bernie Sanders’ campaign

Branding experts explain why 'Better Skills, Better Jobs, Better Wages' is how Republicans end up winning races.

Sean Spicer said he resigned to avoid having “too many cooks in the kitchen”

Sean Spicer said he wanted to give new communications director Anthony Scaramucci a "clean slate."

Report: Jeff Sessions talked about matters related to the Trump campaign with Russian ambassador

Intercepted conversations suggest Sessions may have spoken about campaign-related issues, despite denying that was the case.

3 key takeaways ahead of Jared Kushner’s questioning by Senate Intelligence Committee

Three key takeaways on Kushner's meeting with the Senate Intelligence Committee.

White House comms director Anthony Scaramucci says he’ll start firing people “if leaks don’t stop”

Scaramucci says he will take "dramatic action to stop those leaks."

CNN’s Jake Tapper and Anthony Scaramucci trade barbs in heated interview

The heated interview with the new White House communications director took place Sunday on CNN's 'State of the Union with Jake Tapper.'

The Democrats’ new slogan shows they learned nothing from Bernie Sanders’ campaign

Branding experts explain why 'Better Skills, Better Jobs, Better Wages' is how Republicans end up winning races.

Sean Spicer said he resigned to avoid having “too many cooks in the kitchen”

Sean Spicer said he wanted to give new communications director Anthony Scaramucci a "clean slate."

Report: Jeff Sessions talked about matters related to the Trump campaign with Russian ambassador

Intercepted conversations suggest Sessions may have spoken about campaign-related issues, despite denying that was the case.