Asos proudly displays models with stretch marks on its website

Asos proudly displays models with stretch marks on its website
ASOS models proudly display their stretch marks
Source: ASOS
ASOS models proudly display their stretch marks
Source: ASOS

Although Asos is one of the most massive retailers in the world, it’s been surprisingly thoughtful with its inclusivity. It’s had its cute and trendy curve, petite, tall and maternity sections for women for years, and was one of the first retailers to launch a plus-size men’s section as well.

So it only feels right that Asos is again getting lauded as one of the first major retailers to promote more realistic images of their models’ bodies. These past few days on Twitter, shoppers noticed that Asos is showing models with stretch marks.

Particularly on models who are selling bikinis and bodysuits, you can see plenty of stretch marks on proud display.

A model with stretch marks on the Asos website
Source: ASOS
A model with stretch marks on the Asos website
Source: ASOS
A model with stretch marks on the Asos website
Source: ASOS
A model with stretch marks on the Asos website
Source: ASOS

Twitter has practically lit up at this news, with women celebrating the fact that they can actually see models with more realistic bodies, baring stretch marks and scars and even birth marks.

However, it looks as though this policy isn’t that new. In 2016, one Twitter user pointed it out herself.

In that case, we suppose Asos just never made a formal statement. The increased attention comes just a few weeks after the indie swimsuit brand Rheya Swim launched with models that had stretch marks as well, garnering that company online buzz.

Regardless of when Asos made this change, it matters. Especially for images of models wearing things like swimwear and lingerie, which are usually heavily airbrushed, this move to not alter the photographs feels like we’re inching closer to a world where fashion photography is more realistic, with cellulite and stretch marks on display.

However, one interesting thing that shoppers did notice is that, thus far, stretch marks on the plus-size and curve models Asos uses are still hard to find.

A curve model without stretch marks on the Asos website
Source: ASOS

We ourselves couldn’t find any marks on the models either. In the meantime, Mic has reached out to Asos for further information.

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Rachel Lubitz

Rachel is a senior Style writer at Mic. She previously worked for The Washington Post's Style section for more than three years. Feel free to contact her at rachel@mic.com.

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