Who Won the Election: Obama Win Means Republicans Should Rethink Strategy

Tonight, presidential candidate Mitt Romney lost in his bid against President Obama. But the big loss of the night belongs to the entire Republican Party. Ahead of the 2010 midterm election, the Tea Party usurped the Republican Party. Today, the hard right pull in the GOP caused its’ demise.

In an election where Republicans were able to outspend Democrats heavily with the help of Super PACS and the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision, tonight should be a sincere moment of reflection for the Grand Old Party.

The reason why President Obama came into the election with a significant advantage is because our country no longer believes that if we support the wealthy, they will trickle down their wealth onto everyone else. There is a new mandate, and it is no longer right of center. On the local level, yes, our country is still right of center. But on the national level, we are either directly in the middle or left of center.

If Republicans want to be a viable party again, then they need to move to the center, not to the right.

Virginia and Florida are looking like they will go to the president. In an election where Romney should have fared better, Republicans should be reflective. Republicans must shed their socially conservative members and embrace a socially liberal, fiscally conservative approach if they want to be a viable party.

Over the next two years, Republicans need to moderate or they will meet a more final end in 2014. Congratulations to President Barack Obama, and good luck to a dismantled Republican Party.

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Edward Williams

Edward Williams is currently a 3L at the Georgetown University Law Center. He is a 2009 Teach For America Atlanta Corps Member. He graduated from Howard University in 2009 with a BBA in International Business and Finance with honors. He has interned at JP Morgan and Merrill Lynch in their investment banking/sales and trading divisions, and was a 2010 Teach For America Policy and Advocacy Leadership (PALI) Fellow at the National Council on Teacher Quality in Washington, DC. Edward is originally from Savannah, GA.

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